Thinking Skills Assessment practice

Watson Glaser

Welcome to our feature on the Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice. The Watson Glaser thinking skills test is a psychometric test which assesses your critical thinking skills.

 Rob Williams Assessment offer all types of practice psychometric test resources.

We hope you find our FREE Watson Glaser practice test and Watson glaser Test tips useful!

Try our Passing each Watson Glaser Test section guide too and THE Best Watson Glaser test practice available.

Examples for each Watson Glaser test section

The Watson Glaser test is the most widely used critical thinking test in the world. There are five Watson Glaser sections.

We go through introducing and sharing the instructions for each of these five ‘Watson Glaser subtests’ below. Starting with the first Inferences section.

Practice Watson Glaser Test Inferences.

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson Glaser Test’s Inferences section 

You’ll have to decide whether a follow-on statement is true based on a prior statement.

Again, you have a binary choice in your answer: pick ‘yes’ or ‘no’.

INFERENCES EXAMPLE 1

Firstly, if the lights are on in a house and music can be heard coming from the house, a person might infer that someone is at home. But this inference may or may not be correct. It is possible that the people of the house did not turn the lights and the radio off when they left the house.

You therefore need to reflect upon the following two key Watson Glaser critical reasoning skills:

  • How quickly can you draw conclusions from facts?
  • Can you make judgements based on limited information?

Inferences examples 2, 3, 4

Statement:
Two hundred school students in their early teens voluntarily attended a recent weekend student conference in Leeds. At this conference, the topics of race relations and means of achieving lasting world peace were discussed, since these were problems that the students selected as being most vital in today’s world.


Proposed Inferences:


1. As a group, the students who attended this conference showed a keener interest in broad social problems than do most other people in their early teens.

The correct answer is PT.

Since, most people in their early teens do not show so much serious concern with broad social problems.

2. The majority of the students had not previously discussed the conference topics in the schools.

The correct answer is PF.

Since, the students’ growing awareness of these topics probably stemmed at least in part from
discussions with teachers and classmates.

3. The students came from all parts of the country.

The correct answer is ID.

Since there is no evidence for this inference.

4. The students discussed mainly industrial relations problems.

The correct answer is F.

Since, it is given in the statement of facts that the topics of race relations and means of achieving world peace were the problems chosen for discussion. 

Practice Watson Glaser Test Recognition of Assumptions.

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Recognition of Assumptions section 

Below are a number of statements. Each statement is followed by several proposed assumptions. You are to decide for each assumption whether a person, in making the given statement, is really making that assumption i.e., taking it for granted, justifiably or not. If you think that the given assumption is taken for granted in the statement, mark ‘YES’ under ‘Assumption made’ in the proper place on the answer sheet. If you think the assumption is not necessarily taken for granted in the statement, mark ‘NO’ in the space under ‘Assumption made’. 

Practice Watson Glaser Test Deduction

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Deduction section 

In this test, each exercise consists of several statements (premises) followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, consider the statements in each exercise as true without exception. Read the first conclusion beneath the statements.

If you think it necessarily follows from the statements given, mark ‘YES’ under ‘Conclusion follows’ in the proper place on the Answer Sheet. If you think it is not a necessary conclusion from the statements given mark ‘NO’ under ‘Conclusion follows’, even though you may believe it to be true from your general knowledge. Similarly, read and judge each of the other conclusions.

Deduction examples

Statement: Some holidays are rainy. All rainy days are boring.


Proposed Conclusions:

1. No clear days are boring.

The answer is NO. Since the conclusion does not follow.

You cannot tell from the statements whether or not clear days are boring.

Some may be.

2. Some holidays are boring.

The answer is YES. Since the conclusion necessarily follows from the statements.

According to them, the rainy holidays must be boring.


3. Some holidays are not boring.

The answer is NO.

Since, the conclusion does not follow.

Even though you may know that some holidays are very pleasant.

Practice Watson Glaser Test’s Interpretation

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Logical Interpretation sub-test

Each of the following exercises consists of a short paragraph followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, assume that everything in the short paragraph is true.

The problem is to judge whether or not each of the proposed conclusions logically follows beyond a reasonable doubt from the information given in the paragraph.

If you think that the proposed conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt (even though it may not follow absolutely and necessarily), mark ‘YES’ under ‘Conclusion Follows’ in the proper place on the answer sheet. If you think that the conclusion does not follow beyond a reasonable doubt from the facts given, mark ‘NO’ under ‘Conclusion Follows’.

Interpretation examples

Statement: A study of vocabulary growth in children from eight months to six years old shows that the size
of spoken vocabulary increases from 0 words at age eight months to 2,562 words at age six years.

Proposed Conclusions:

1. None of the children in this study had learned to talk by the age of six months.

YES, the conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt since, according to the statement, the size of the spoken vocabulary at eight months was 0 words.


2. Vocabulary growth is slowest during the period when children are learning to walk.

NO, the conclusion does not follow as there is no information given that relates growth of vocabulary to walking.

Practice Watson Glaser Test Evaluation of Arguments

INSTRUCTIONS Evaluation of Arguments sub-test

  • Each Evaluation of Arguments question is followed by several arguments.
  • For the purpose of the Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments sub-test, you are to regard each argument as true.
  • The problem then is to decide whether it is a strong or a weak argument. For an argument to be strong, it must be both important and directly related to the question. Whereas an argument is weak if it is:
    • Not directly related to the question. Even though it may be of great general importance.
    • Or if it is of minor importance.
    • Or if it is related only to trivial aspects of the question.

Evaluation of Arguments examples

Statement: Should all young people in the United Kingdom go on to higher education?

Proposed Arguments:

1. Yes; college provides an opportunity for them to wear college scarves.

WEAK, this would be a silly reason for spending years in college.

2. No; a large percentage of young people do not have enough ability or interest to derive any benefit from college training.

STRONG. If it is true, as the directions require us to assume, it is a weighty argument against all young people going to college.

3. No; excessive studying permanently warps an individual’s personality.

WEAK, this argument, although of great general importance when accepted as true, is not directly.

What is Watson Glaser test?

The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, published by Pearson company Talent Lens, measures critical thinking skills and the capacity for solving problems.

Law firms and law schools all over the globe use Watson Glaser test results to sift out those prospectie lawyers with lesser critical thinking skills.

How is the Watson Glaser Test given?

  • The newer vision of the Watson Glaser test takes 40 minutes, whereas the older test requires 55 minutes.
  • It is crucial when taking the Watson Glaser to only use the information presented.
  • This is intentional since these legal recruitment must assesses such unbiased and objective thinking skills.

What are the 5 Watson Glaser sections?

:et’s start with this question: How many sections are in the Watson Glaser Test? There are five test sections in the Watson Glaser Test. As follows:

  1. ASSUMPTIONS.
  2. ANALYSING ARGUMENTS
  3. DEDUCTIONS
  4. INFERENCES
  5. INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS

Now let us consider each of these five Watson Glaser sub-tests in detail.

Plus how a lawyer demostrated the necessary critical reasoning skills needed to pass that Watson Glaser sub-test.

And then we will move on to consider how to pass each Watson Glaser sub-test.

Watson Glaser test practice

What is the Watson Glaser ASSUMPTIONS sub-test ?

The Watson glaser sub-test called Assumptions is all about recongising where assumptions have been made. Of course these are unstated. So in practice a criminal barrister needs to be able to spot assumptions that are being made in a criminal case. And to then bring such ‘unstated assumptions’ to the attention of the judge and jury.

What does the Watson Glaser ASSUMPTIONS sub-test look like?

  • Sets of statements are presented to the candidate.
  • Each Watson Glaser candidate must then determine whether each of these presented assumptions have been made by the passage.
  • Or not been assumed within the Watson Glaser Assumptions text passage.

Watson Glaser test practice

ANALYSING ARGUMENTS subtest

In this Watson Glaser sub-test, each argument presented to the Watson Glaser test-taker must be analysed. Then the list of points in favour and points against the contentious position must be reviewed.

This replicates how a lawyer must assess both the arguments they themselves use. Plus the arguments used against their own case.

What does the Watson Glaser ANALYSING ARGUMENTS sub-test look like?

  1. Watson Glaser candidates need to consider how relevant each argued point is to the original question posed.
  2. Then to determine whether each argued point is weak because it does not directly relate to the posed question, or strong because it does.

Watson Glaser test practice

DEDUCTIONS Watson Glaser sub-test

Here, Watson Glaser candidates need to determinie whether certain conclusions follow necessarily from the information presented in each Watson Glaser Deductions’ series of statements.

What does the Watson Glaser DEDUCTIONS sub-test look like?

Here, candidates evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose; determining if each deduction does or does follow on from the information in the passage.

Watson Glaser test practice

INFERENCES Watson Glaser test section

The Inferences sub-test of the Watson Glaser Test involves evaluating the validity of inferences. These are drawn from a series of factual statements.

What does the Watson Glaser ANALYSING ARGUMENTS sub-test look like?

In this Watson Glaser subtest, candidates are presented with a list of possible inferences from a passage; rating each one as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say from the information provided.

Watson Glaser test practice

INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS Watson Glaser sub-test

Here, in this Watson Glaser test section, candidates must analyse the ‘evidence’ provided in a passage of prose. This is similar to the critical reasoning processes described in the Inferences Watson Glaser sub-test section described above.

What does the Watson Glaser INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS sub-test look like?

Watson Glaser candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.

Watson Glaser test practice

So, what is the Watson Glaser’s Critical Reasoning?

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn.

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

Is the Watson Glaser an aptitude test?

Yes, it is an aptitude test; assessing your ability to think critically, evaluate arguments, recognise assumptions, assess strong and weak arguments and draw conclusions. 

Normally, you’ll have around 40 questions, split into five different sections: inference assessment, recognising assumptions, deduction interpretation and evaluation of arguments.

Questions will ask things like whether a statement is true or false, based on the information given.

What’s the pass mark?

There’s no set pass or fail mark. Assessment is based on a percentile basis compared to the rest of the applicants. You may receive your percentile score, but this depends on the firm to which you’re applying. 

What’s the time limit?

The test takes approximately 35-40 minutes to complete, either online or in paper-and-pencil format. Although, the amount of time you have depends on which law firm you’re applying to. The typical duration is 30 minutes, meaning you’ll have about 45 seconds to answer each question. However, each firm can give out their own deadlines.

How can I get extra time?

Legally, you are allowed to receive extra time to complete the Watson Glaser test if you specify a disability in advance. Hence, it’s important to contact the law firm and provide them with the relevant details ahead of time. 

How can I prepare for the Watson Glaser test?

To prepare for the Watson Glaser test, there are quite a few free practice tests available online, giving the chance to get a feel for it. If you want to practice more, there are others available online for a fee. It’s a good idea to try out as many practice tests as possible, to ensure you can complete it within the time limit.

Aside from practice tests, there are many simple ways you can prepare for the exam. The Watson Glaser test aims to assess your critical thinking skills, so it’s a good idea to practice this.

You can do this by reading articles or watching debates, and trying to think about the strength of the arguments. However, be sure to set personal biases aside when doing this. During the test, it’s vital that you answer the questions based on the information given, forgetting about information from elsewhere.

With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal critical reasoning test.

What are the Watson Glaser’s 5 sections?

The  critical reasoning questions in the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal are divided into five sections.

Each section’s type of critical verbal reasoning test is described below: 

1. Watson Glaser Test’s Recognition of Assumptions Section

Following each set of statements, this section asks the candidate whether any of a series of assumptions has been made by the passage, or not. 

2. Watson Glaser Test’s Evaluation of Arguments sub-test

 Each set of question in this Watson Glaser section starts with a contentious question. Or whether it is a strong argument because it does relate directly. 

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

3. Watson Glaser Test’s Deduction Section

Here, candidates must evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose. Then determine if each deduction does or does not follow on from the information in the passage. 

4. Inference section of the Watson Glaser Test

Candidates must rate each possible inference as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say. This analysis must be based each time only on the Watson Glaser information provided. Not from any other background or prior knowledge.

5. Evaluation of Arguments Watson Glaser SubTest

From the evidence within a passage of prose, candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.  

Critical Reasoning Test Introduction

  • Critical reasoning tests, such as the LNAT, ask you to identify assumptions, inferences and the points made within “overall” arguments.
  • It does not assess any knowledge of laws or any legal ability.
  • You need to answer 42 questions.

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn. With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal critical reasoning test.

What is critical reasoning?

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn. With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal reasoning critical reasoning test.

How to prepare for Critical Thinking tests

These are a learned skill. With the right training, most individuals who have an average or above the ability to learn can develop reasonable critical thinking skills. Critical thinking skills include the ability to define a problem clearly, the ability to formulate and select relevant hypotheses and to judge the validity of inferences. A good grasp of these skills enables a person to ‘think on his feet’, to assess evidence and arguments and to communicate clearly.

Who uses critical reasoning skills?

Everyone uses these skills sometimes, but some job roles specifically require a high level of verbal critical reasoning. For example, many senior managerial and executive positions require you to assess evidence effectively and to communicate your position clearly.

Lawyers, in particular, need excellent critical reasoning skills. Barristers, for example, use critical reasoning to:

  • Remain objective and not to be prejudiced by their own opinions.
  • Analyze large amounts of verbal information to build a case for their client.
  • Identify the different ways legal doctrine can be interpreted.
  • Present their evidence in court and state their conclusion based on it.

A judge (or jury) will in turn use their critical reasoning skills to balance all the evidence for and against the accused and reach a verdict.

Journalists also need to have a high level of critical reasoning skills. When commenting on a current affairs debate, a journalist will typically present all sides of the argument. After careful thought, and backed up by evidence, they then commit their own analysis to the page.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

Deduction v Inference

It’s not just the person writing a newspaper article who needs to use critical reasoning skills – the person reading the article needs to apply their own critical reasoning skills too. An astute reader always asks: Does the writer’s overall conclusion follow on from the evidence and facts presented?

This question is an example of logical deduction or deductive reasoning – the linking of one or more statements, or premises, to make a logically sound conclusion.

On the other hand, inductive reasoning or inference, is based on discerning what is probable or what is likely to be true from true premises. Critical reasoning involves applying both inductive and deductive reasoning to arguments.

What kind of Watson Glaser questions are there?

Some questions will ask the candidate whether a statement is True or False, as per a verbal comprehension critical reasoning test. The inherent logic – or otherwise – of these arguments is critical reasoning tested. The presented evidence and facts need to be analysed and subtle shades of meaning interpreted.

There are three broad types of critical reasoning question, as seen in the practice critical reasoning tests in Part 2.

Interpretation-type questions:
  • Which sentence best summarizes the passage?
  • … word could be substituted for another in the passage?
  • Which of the following words is the most suitable replacement?
  • What is meant by the following term?
  • Which facts are included in the passage?
Summary-type questions:
  • What is the main point the passage is making?
  • Which of the following statements best summarizes the second paragraph?
  • … statement best summarises what the author is saying in the last paragraph?
  • Which of these statements does not form part of the passage’s argument?

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

Assumptions and Deductions:
  • What can be inferred about X from the passage?
  • Which of the following can be deduced from the passage?
  • … of the following assumptions is made in the passage?
  • Which statements lend support to the passage’s argument?
  • … of these opinions is expressed by the author?

Improving the speed with which you can digest complex prose will help your critical reasoning test performance. Read the passage quickly the first time to get a feel for the main points. Then read the passage a second time more carefully, mentally noting the key content of each paragraph. Focus on the core of the argument and its supporting evidence, together with the author’s stance on the issue.

Watson-Glaser practice

While you need to absorb the critical reasoning test passages as efficiently as possible, that does not mean that you need to rush your answers. Quite the opposite, since there will be many different question formats. It is very important to double check that you are 100% clear on what the question is asking for.

To pass a critical reasoning critical reasoning test you need to understand the development of an argument – in particular, what points provide factual support. Reading commentary on political, social and economic debates will certainly improve your understanding.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

How can I pass my critical reasoning test?

As you read such material, ask yourself:

– How are individual’s opinions, counteracts and factual evidence expressed.

– Is there one or more argument? One or more conclusion?

– Is each piece of information reliable? Would you draw the same conclusion yourself.

– What additional information would you need to frame a counterargument?

-Do not let your own general knowledge lead you astray. It’s vital that you do not let any of your personal opinions or your general knowledge influence your answers even slightly. This recommendation applies even if it seems that the correct answer is in direct contradiction to what you know or believe to be true.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

Critical reasoning test tips

To summarise,these are the skills you need to demonstrate to succeed on a critical reasoning critical reasoning test:

  • Identifying statements that are untrue.
  • Separating facts from inferences and opinions.
  • Identifying the implications of a factual statement.
  • Making logical deductions from a passage of prose.

Everyone uses these skills sometimes, but some job roles specifically require a high level of verbal critical reasoning. For example, many senior managerial and executive positions require you to assess evidence effectively and to communicate your position clearly.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

Lawyers, in particular, need excellent critical reasoning skills. Barristers, for example, need to employ a wide range of critical reasoning skills. Such as thefollowing:

  • Remaining objective and unbiased.
  • Analyzing large amounts of verbal information to build a case for their client.
  • Identifying different legal interpretations.
  • Presenting their evidence in court.
  • Stating their conclusion based on that evidence.

A judge (or jury) will, in turn, use their critical reasoning skills to balance all the evidence for and against the accused and reach a verdict.

Similarly, journalists also need to have a high level of critical reasoning skills. When commenting on a current affairs debate, a journalist will present all sides of the argument. After careful thought, and backed up by evidence, they then commit their own analysis to the page.

Watson Glaser Test summary features

Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal® Critical Thinking Test Study II The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal® (published by another Pearson company Talent Lens) measures critical thinking skills and the capacity for solving problems. The test takes approximately 35-40 minutes to complete, either online or in paper-and-pencil format. It is most commonly used for student selection and for either managerial selection, or identifying senior managerial potential. The  critical reasoning questions in the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal are divided into five sections. Each section’s type of critical verbal reasoning test is described below: SUBTEST QUESTION FORMAT Assumptions Set of statements and to ask the candidate whether any of a series of assumption has been made by the passage, or not. Analysing Arguments The argument that has to be analysed is a contentious question given at the outset of this section of the Watson-Glaser. It is followed by a list of points in favour and points against the contentious position. Candidates need to consider how relevant each argued point is to the original question posed. Then to determine whether each argued point is weak because it does not directly relate to the posed question, or strong because it does. Deductions Here, candidates evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose; determining if each deduction does or does follow on from the information in the passage. Inferences In this subtest, candidates are presented with a list of possible inferences from a passage; rating each one as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say from the information provided. Interpreting Information: From the evidence within a passage of prose, candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.    

What must I always remember to pass the Watson Glaser Test?

As with all critical reasoning test questions, it is imperative that answers are based only on the information presented. One of the reasoning skills being assessed is objective decision-making; without any bias from your own background knowledge, opinions and beliefs. You will not be required to utilise any prior knowledge when answering a question, and at times the correct answer will completely contradict what you know to be true based on your own knowledge, but is true in the context of the passage. you may have already formed opinions and have your own understanding of the facts of the matter at hand. It becomes even more important than usual with this type of verbal test to only base your answers on the information provided in the passage. You will most probably find yourself thinking of the knowledge that you already have on the subject of a passage.

Good luck with your Watson Glaser test!

Watson Glaser Practice Tests