CogAT test practice

Situational judgement test tips

Our free practice situational judgement test tips are listed after our premium situational judgement test practice links below.

Premium Situational judgement test practice

Additional situational judgment test tips are available in Rob Williams Assessment Ltd’s latest Career Builder articles. In particular, you may find this article useful, What you need to know about situational judgement tests.

Situational judgement test design specialists

We are assessment specialists in both work and education settings. For more insights into meaningful assessments contact Rob Williams Assessment for a comprehensive appraisal.

SJT selection test examples for specific career entry

  1. Police Situational Judgement Test tips
  2. Train Driver Situational Judgement Test tips
  3. Firefighter Situational Judgement Test tips

Our Top Situational Judgement Test Tips

  • Each situational judgement test scenario will measure one of these competencies based on both the best and worst answers, so focus on getting both  You won’t need to get every question right, however scoring low on any given competency will detract from your overall situational judgement test score.
  • Each situational judgement test scenario requires you to make an effective judgment. This will involve prioritising which aspects of the scenario are most important to fix first. Identifying and addressing this vital element of each scenario is the key to passing a situational judgment test. Any answer option that does not move the scenario situation forward will not be the correct “Best” action to take. The “Worst” answer option will be one that makes the situation even worse.
  • While several answer options may seem like a sufficient solution in the short-term, you shouldn’t be looking for a quick and easy stop-gap solution. The “Best” solution will always be the one that actually solves the problem. You need to identify a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits.
  • Be your most ethical self when taking an situational judgement test. Any answer option that is slightly unethical or dishonest to anyone involved will not be the correct answer. Look for the most virtuous answer if there is one – demonstrating respect for others, integrity and conscientiousness.
  • Logically, the “Best” and “Worst” answers need to be distinct from the other answer options. Hence if two answer options seem very similar to you, it’s likely these are the “distractor” answer options and neither the best – or the worst – answer.

More situational judgement test tips

  • Firstly, identify which 3-4 factors need to be considered in your decision-making. For example: time, money and quality impact upon many business decisions.
  • Think in advance of the highest priority criteria: which could be commercial awareness, planning/organising, maintaining an ethical approach.
  • Note, that this is important since when you are presented with an SJT scenario you must “judge” the Best and Worst response to that scenario within that specific work context.
  • Judge the Best response to be the one that addresses all these factors. It’s advisable to answer as the most ethical employee.
  • In our opinion, firstly if two of the answer options are very similar then it’s unlikely that either one is the Best or Worst answer. For example, a short-term fix to the SJT scenario would only be half-right.
  • In our opinion, secondly, you need to select an answer option with a longer-term, complete solution.

Our Top Situational Judgement Test Tips

  • Each SJT scenario will measure one of these competencies based on both the best and worst answers, so focus on getting both correct.
  • Each SJT scenario requires you to make an effective judgement. This will involve prioritising which aspects of the scenario are most important to fix first. . Any answer option that does not move the scenario situation forward will not be the correct “Best” action to take. The “Worst” answer option will be one that makes the situation even worse.
  • While several answer options may seem like a sufficient solution in the short-term, you shouldn’t be looking for a quick and easy stop-gap solution. The “Best” solution will always be the one that actually solves the problem. You need to identify a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits.
  • Be your most ethical self when taking an SJT. Any answer option that is slightly unethical or dishonest to anyone involved will not be the correct answer. Look for the most virtuous answer if there is one – demonstrating respect for others, integrity and conscientiousness.
  • Logically, the “Best” and “Worst” answers need to be distinct from the other answer options. Check if two answer options seem very similar to you. It’s likely these are the “distractor” answer options and neither the best – or the worst – answer.

Situational judgement practice. Woman on customer service call.

Best / Worst answers

Make a mental note of any differences with previous SJTs you’ve done. Typically you have to select which is the Best answer option, sometimes you also need to select the Worst option. Another common situational judgement test format is to choose which of the answer options are appropriate. For example, the situation judgement tests for Foundation Entry to become a doctor – the entire UKCAT application suite of tests also encompasses verbal reasoning, numerical reasoning, abstract reasoning and decision analysis sub-tests.

Unique answers

Secondly, look for unique answer options. Before answering, always read both the scenario and all the best possible answer options very carefully. The answer options are independent of each other. So if you do find two possible responses that are similar, you must study these and determine whether one is in fact a slightly better response than the other answer option. Always remember that it is the best available response required (from those shown). Also remember that you need to select what an individual Should do in the circumstances described. So, don’t answer with what you think is most likely to happen.

Long term solutions

Fourth, avoid solutions that only work in the short-term. Although several of the options may appear valid in the short-term and it’s tempting to be biased towards taking immediate action… remember that it’s the Best response that’s needed. This is more likely to be a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits and does not require the managers (or other team members) to revisit the problem and solve it at a later date.

Situational judgement test tips – Answer honestly

Fifth, focus on answering as the most honest and ethical person you can be. Be your best possible self, not just in terms of your most focused, high-performing self but equally as important is to answer as though you are the most ethical worker. Every correct answer must be founded on honesty, respect, patience and many other virtuous qualities.

How to answer situational judgement tests

Remember specific instructions, such as answering what you should do. Remember that typically, situational judgement test instructions specify you to state what you should do. There may be a subtle difference on some situational judgement test questions between what you should and what you would do in that situational judgement test scenario.

People in office sitting at table discussion situational judgement test tips.

Know the role requirements

Reflect upon the job role’s core requirements. Consider the job role that you are applying for. The vast majority of jobs require effective teamwork so don’t give any situational judgement test question a Best answer that implies you have a poor understanding of collaborative working.

Also, think through the

  1. Role’s main responsibilities.
  2. Limits of these responsibilities
  3. People and financial resources available to you
  4. What remedial actions could you realistically take?

Often an situational judgement test test poses questions to test your understanding of what you cannot do within the confines of the job role. For example, the UKCAT situational judgement test that must be passed to get into a UK medical school will pose situational judgement test questions about patient confidentiality. It would be unwise to answer any situational judgement test question that brought into doubt your (medical) ethics.

Ignore the obviously incorrect

Plus, remove those answer options you know must be incorrect. With some psychometric tests, such as situational judgement tests, a useful test-taking strategy is to start by eliminating those answer options which are clearly inappropriate. Sometimes, rejecting several answer options may leave only the correct answer option for you to promptly select. Thereby saving you considerable test-taking time to use on other situational judgement test questions.

Situational judgement test tips 

Also, always remember that any unethical answer options must be incorrect. Following on from situational judgement test Tip (9) there are particular actions which are highly unlikely to be the correct answer. 

Fourth, avoid solutions that only work in the short-term. Although several of the options may appear valid in the short-term and it’s tempting to be biased towards taking immediate action… remember that it’s the Best response that’s needed. This is more likely to be a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits and does not require the managers (or other team members) to revisit the problem and solve it at a later date.

  • Plus, break the problem scenario down into the underlying constraints. Break down each situational judgement test scenario using logical analysis of the scenario’s components.
  • You must establish the principal problem being set, plus any secondary constraints on the correct answer.  Knowing the principle situational judgement test problem then allows you to dismiss any of the possible situational judgement test answer options that do not address the situational judgement test’s principal problem.
  • Then – from the situational judgement test’s remaining answer options – you can select the correct one as being that situational judgement test answer option which also addresses the scenario’s secondary constraints.

Avoid similar answer options

  • Review the answer options to check if there are two answer options that are very similar. It’s then worth focusing on the other answer options. Here’s the logic for why you can ignore the two similar situational judgement test answer options.
  • The two answer options may differ in the form of action proposed. However think realistically; is the actual outcome from selecting either of these two situational judgement test answer options going to be the same?
  • If so, then neither of these two situational judgement test answer options can be the best response. Or the Worst response to the situational judgement test scenario (by applying the same logical reasoning).

Learn from your feedback

  • Effective feedback is the key to improving your overall performance. That means going through the answer explanations in detail.
  • After each situational judgement test practice session, keep a record of how many questions you get right.
  • Compare your performances so you can gauge your improvement over time.

Work efficiently

  • Most tests are timed and you need to cultivate a focused and alert approach.
  • Your first priority is to work accurately as there’s no benefit in getting situational judgment test questions wrong.
  • But remember that the person sitting next to you could pass because they answered more questions than you did – even though they also got more questions wrong.

Review any careless mistakes

  • If you find yourself making too many careless mistakes you clearly need to slow down.
  • Yes, you need to work at a brisk pace, but the key is to find the fastest pace that allows you to get situational judgment test questions right.
  • It is also essential to read every word of every question very, very carefully to avoid sloppy mistakes.

Look for trends

  • Do you tend to make more mistakes at the beginning of your practice session?
  • This could be a consequence of nerves.
  • You need to work on achieving a high state of mental alertness immediately and giving the test 100 per cent focus as soon as you start work.

Analyse how you make mistakes

  • Are you making more mistakes near the end of your SJT practice session? This could be because you are rushing the last few situational judgement test questions. You need to work steadily and maintain concentration throughout any situational judgment test you take.
  • Are you clear on why you are getting certain situational judgement test questions wrong? This is key to improving – you need to learn from your mistakes. It’s vital to know where you need to improve most. If you are unaccustomed to a particular type of situational judgement question it makes sense to spend additional time getting comfortable with these questions. Don’t assume that you can pass without learning how to do that sort of situational judgment test question.

Have your own strategy!

  • SJTs are tricky with or without a strategy. The more specialised the role to which to you are applying for the more technical the SJT answer options will appear to you. In which case it really is a case of knowing the Best and the Worst options.

Use a Step-by-step approach

  • Logically, the “Best” and “Worst” answers need to be distinct from the other answer options. Hence if two answer options seem very similar to you, it’s likely these are the “distractor” answer options and neither the best – or the worst – answer. You are then asked to select your most preferred and least preferred responses:
  • Aim to be as ethical as possible when answering an situational judgement test. Focus on answering as the most honest and ethical person you can be. Since…
  • Any answer option that is slightly unethical or dishonest to anyone involved will not be the correct answer.
  • Be your best possible self. Be your most focused, high-performing self. Equally important though is to answer as though you are the most ethical worker. Every correct answer must be founded on honesty, respect, patience and many other virtuous qualities.

Also, always remember that unethical answer options must be incorrect. Here are a few examples of what we mean:

  • Non-compliance with organisational or industry rules/governance;
  • Type of dishonesty;
  • Challenging actions directed to your manager, or to those higher up the organisational ladder;
  • Aggressive actions or intent;
  • Hiding of errors or mistakes – particularly personal ones.

Situational judgement test tips

Situational Judgement Test Design Examples

Enjoy our free situational judgement test design examples.

Intro to situational judgement tests

Each situational judgmeent test respondent must review a full set of scenarios. For each SJT scenario the respondent must analyse the possible rationale for each multiple-choice answer options being the correct answer.

For example, making a judgement…

  • As to which answer response option is most closely aligned with the company’s expectations. This could be around complying with company rules or acting in line with company values.
  • Based on ambiguous or incomplete information.
  • On achieving a shared goal.
  • About which actions are more likely to achieve the objective (outlined in the SJT scenario).
  • On how best to interact with colleagues in their team. Or on a work project.

Working With Others situational judgement test example

EPSO SJT Example 1 – Working with Others

Most Likely / Least Likely

If a problem requiring urgent attention occurred in my department but I know that it was a colleague’s responsibility, I would…
a Continue as normal and stay focused on doing my own job.
b Inform my manager about the colleague who was a fault.
c Stop doing whatever I was doing and help to fix the problem.

M

d Consider it my supervisor’s job to speak to the colleague at fault.

L

Delivering Quality and Results competency example

EPSO SJT Example 1 – Delivering Quality and Results

Most Likely / Least Likely

Two colleagues are transferred into your team from a poorly performing team; comprised mainly of new joiners. Your manager proposes that you monitor the quality of their work. It is your responsibility to drive their performance upwards.
a Produce and review daily performance reports before sending them to your manager.
b Set additional targets of a type that each colleague has agreed will motivate them           M
c Give the two colleagues a  few days to settle in and then call a meeting.
d Ask each of the two colleagues which reward will be the most effective at motivating them.

L

Prioritising and Organising competency – Situational judgement test example

EPSO SJT Example 1 – Prioritising and Organising

Most Likely / Least Likely

You have two very important deadlines to meet by the end of your working day. However it is becoming clear in your final two hours of working that you are in danger of missing both deadlines.
a Speed up your remaining tasks so that you will still be able to meet both deadlines.
b Aim to achieve one deadline and to renegotiate the delivery date for the other.
c Work out what’s left to do and then prioritise the most critical tasks for the time remaining.

M

d Focus on still doing a quality job even if you must miss a deadline.

L

Analysis and Problem-Solving competency

EPSO SJT Example 1 – Analysis and Problem-Solving

Most Likely / Least Likely

This year there’s already been lots of new processes causing some problems amongst your team. As a result, some of your colleagues are now very resistant handling any more change. In fact, one of your closest team colleagues has just confided in you that they really cannot cope with another increase in their daily responsibilities.
a Advise your superior a colleague was feeling very stressed, which could be a wider team problem           M
b Be empathetic whilst suggesting that they are more confident about their capacity for coping.
c Advise your colleague to take a deep breath for the time being, and to wait for things to improve.
d Suggest that there are specialists who are experienced at coping with stress at work.

L

Resilience competency – Situational judgement test example

EPSO SJT Example 2 – Resilience

Most Likely / Least Likely

Each member of your team agreed a set of priorities with your manager. Surprisingly you and the team just heard a presentation by this senior manager outlining a completely different set of priorities.
a Get your team’s perspective on the situation and pass on these views to your manager.
b Email your senior manager a breakdown of the differences and copy in each of your team.
c Focus on the meeting and its outcomes – the previous set of priorities is clearly now out -of-date.

L

d Highlight to your senior manager how what you just heard contradicts what was said before.

M

situational judgement test tips

Additional assessment practice

Personality test tips

OPQ personality test tips and MBTI personality test tips.

Our psychometric test designs

Personality Test Design , Situational Judgment Test Design and

Army situational judgement test design.