Category Archives: Aptitude Test Practice

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Secondly, you can find all of the tips and practice on our site.

We hope you find both of these useful.

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Watson Glaser Test practice

What’s the Watson Glaser test?

The Watson Glaser test is produced by test publisher TalentLens and are considered one of the most trusted methods of evaluating critical reasoning.

We hope you find our FREE Watson Glaser practice test and Watson glaser Test tips useful!

Try our Passing each Watson Glaser Test section guide too and THE Best Watson Glaser test practice available.

 Rob Williams Assessment offer all types of practice psychometric test resources.

Each Watson-Glaser test is composed of scenarios similar to those typically found in a variety of settings, including the workplace, the school, and other organisational settings.

Applying critical reasoning to a subject or issue involves:

  • Considering it from various perspectives.
  • Identifying what is fact, compared to which parts are assumptions. Or opinions.
  • Drawing logical conclusions
  • Using the above critical reasoning to inform the decision making process.

Here you can download Pearson TalentLens introducing their own Watson Glaser key features:

We also recommend School Entrance Testscritical thinking tests introduction and Watson Glaser test practice resources.

Passing Watson Glaser Test section-by-section

The Watson Glaser test is the most widely used critical thinking test in the world. There are five Watson Glaser sections. We go through introducing and sharing the instructions for each of these five ‘Watson Glaser subtests’ below:

You therefore need to reflect upon the following two key Watson Glaser critical reasoning skills:

  • How quickly can you draw conclusions from facts?
  • Can you make judgements based on limited information?

2) Passing Watson Glaser Recognition of Assumptions question type

Let’s start with the key learning point, what is an assumption?

An assumption is something presupposed or taken for granted. When you say, ‘I’ll be a qualified solicitor in two months’, you take it for granted that you will be alive in two months, that you will pass the relevant examinations, and similar things.

Remember to judge each assumption independently. 

3) Passing Watson Glaser Test’s Deduction section 

  • Try not to let your prejudices influence your judgement – just stick to the given statements.
  • So, you must judge whether each conclusion follows on. Or not.
  • The word ‘some’ in any of these statements means an indefinite part of quantity of a class of things.
  • ‘Some’ means at least a portion, and perhaps all of the class.

4) Passing the Watson Glaser Interpretation questions

  • How well can you assess the weight of different arguments given a predetermined assumed-to-be-true statement?
  • You must decide whether the conclusion is fair ‘beyond reasonable doubt’.
  • Again, you can only answer ‘yes’ or ‘n’.
  • You need to firstly, focus on whether each assumption or conclusion is true or not.
  • Secondly, to avoid personal opinions.
  • Also you must remember to judge each conclusion independently.

5) Passing Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments section 
  • You need to firstly ensure that each argument makes sense. However there is more to the Watson Glaser Argument Evaluation of Arguments section than that.
  • Your key focus then needs to be on the following: distinguishing between strong and weak arguments.
  • Remember to judge each argument separately on its own merit.
  • Try not to let your personal attitude toward the question influence your evaluation of the argument, since each argument is to be regarded as true.
Why does the Watson Glaser Test have a Evaluation of Arguments section?

In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between arguments that are strong and arguments that are weak, as far as the question at issue is concerned.

What skills do critical thinking tests like the Watson Glaser Test require?

The following skills contribute to effective critical thinking:

  • Interpreting information
  • Differentiating fact from fallacy
  • Drawing evidence-based conclusions
  • Identifying sound arguments
  • Taking an objective stance

How does the Watson Glaser assess critical thinking?

The Watson Glaser test assesses critical thinking skills via:

  • Statements
  • Text passages
  • Asking which inferences / deductions / assumptions can be made based on the above
  • By objectively weighing up the strength of an argument.

No prior knowledge is required since the Watson Glaser relies on existing knowledge being ‘igored’. The respondent can only use the evidence presented verbally in each Watson Glaser question.

When is the Watson Glaser used?

When you are applying for a

  • graduate,
  • professional or
  • managerial role.

As long as critical thinking is a prerequisite skill to do that role effectively.

What is the format of a Watson Glaser test?

The Watson Glaser test is a timed, multiple-choice assessment, the most recent version of which consists of 40 questions with a 30-minute time constraint.

There are the following five sections in the Watson Glaser:

Drawing inferences

You’ll need to critically analyse the information in the given paragraph to determine if these statements are true, probably true, false, probably false, or if there is insufficient proof to determine either way.

Recognising assumptions

Assumptions relate to what we understand to be true without needing solid proof. They are the underlying facts that give an argument its validity.

If the statement relies on the assumption being true, you would mark it as ‘assumption made’.

If the assumption is irrelevant to the statement, or bears no weight on its validity, you would mark it as ‘assumption not made’.

Deduction

Deductive reasoning is the act of arriving at a fact-based conclusion through a logical thought process. A deduction differs from an assumption in that it is what we take away from an argument, as opposed to the facts on which an argument needs to stand.

Based solely on the evidence presented in a statement or short paragraph, you’ll need to determine if a list of conclusions do or do not logically follow on from the information in front of you.

Interpreting

  • determine whether a given conclusion can logically be drawn from an argument.
  • Identify significant pieces of information and
  • decide if a logical interpretation can be applied in support of the conclusion in question.

Evaluating arguments

This last section looks at your ability to separate a weak argument from a strong one. You’ll need to decide if an argument is relevant and challenging, and therefore strong, or vague and unrealistic, and therefore weak.

What skills does it look to measure?

The five sections combined give an overall picture of your performance in key areas, and measure your ability to:

  • Define a problem
  • Select key points of information to formulate a solution
  • Hypothesise, or select an applicable hypothesis based on limited evidence
  • Draw fact-based conclusions
  • Determine the probability of an inference

Watson Glaser Test practice

What is a pass score on the Watson Glaser tests?

It is therefore difficult to state an exact pass score on the test, since it depends entirely on the performance of your peers. Ideally, you’d look to reach 75% and above to give yourself a competitive edge.

Which professions use Watson Glaser tests, and why?

Watson Glaser test usage is most common in the legal and professional services sectors. In other words, the law, banking and financial sectors. In many such roles executives must regularly take nformed business decisions. Each decison must be rooted in fact. As well as being objectively free from any biased thinking.

How should I prepare for the Watson Glaser?

Recognising assumptions. Instead of simply taking things at face value, such as the news or a part of a conversation with a friend or co-worker, ask yourself if what you’re hearing can actually be classified as true, and what the facts are that back it up. Are they evidential, or based on assumptions?

Evaluating arguments. We’re all guilty of seeking out information that confirms our own perspective. Instead, actively look for opinions that contradict your own and assess them from an objective point of view. The better you become at seeing both sides of a story, the more prepared you’ll be to critically evaluate arguments in your Watson Glaser test.

Drawing conclusions. These conclusions may not align with your own perspective, but a Watson Glaser test requires that you conclude impartially – and as with most things in life, practice makes perfect here.

Watson Glaser tips

Study the practice questions

In the official test, you’ll have the opportunity to complete practice questions. These are there for a reason, so use them wisely.

Leave instinct and intuition at the door

To succeed on a Watson Glaser test, you need to go against human nature and ignore everything you think you know. Each question will contain all the relevant information you need. Whether you believe it to be true, agree with it, or not, is irrelevant. For the sake of the test, evaluate only the information provided in each passage.

Watson Glaser Test practice

Examine each question carefully

You may feel the need to rush under the time pressure, but attention to detail is vital.

Look for keywords and phrases

The statement, proposition or paragraph of text at the start of each question will inevitably include keywords or phrases that relate directly to the assumptions, inferences or conclusions given. These are your clues. Identify them, and you’ll find it much easier to analyse each scenario objectively.

Split your time evenly

Remember, you have a set amount of time to work through all five sections of the test. Split this evenly across the board before you start, and keep track of how much time you spend on each question. It may seem counterintuitive to add to the pressure, but in setting yourself a time frame, you eliminate the risk of dedicated excessive attention to any one part of the test.

How can I improve my critical thinking skills?

  • To improve your skills,
  • tune in to the world around you,
  • Ask questions,
  • Read actively
  • Look for evidence in every statement or argument you come across.
  • Take practice tests regularly to assess your progress.

Our other thinking skills test practice

TSA test practice

CogAT test practice

CogAT

Welcome to our CogAT test practice and CCAT test practice.

If you can’t find what you are looking for here, then we suggest reviewing the full range of School Entrance exam practice tests here.

What is the CogAT Test?

The COgAt is:

  • A non-verbal test designed as a multiple-choice test
  • Aimed at testing the academic aptitude and gifted abilities of children
  • Used in schools to test the cognitive development in children studying in grades K- 12.

Our levels of CogAT test practice

We offer each school year’s Level of CogAT test practice:

Firstly, CogAT practice tests (Level 7) Basic and CogAT practice tests (Level 9) Premium.

Secondly, 2nd Grade CogAT practice tests (Level 8) Basic and 2nd Grade CogAT practice tests (Level 8) Premium.

Thirdly, Grade 3 CogAT practice tests (Level 9) Basic and Grade 3 CogAT practice tests (Level 9) Premium.

And also,   4th Grade CogAT practice tests (Level 10) Basic and 4th Grade CogAT practice tests (Level 10) Premium.

Then next, Grade 5 CogAT practice tests (Level 11) Basic and Grade 5 CogAT practice tests (Level 11) Premium.

And finally, CogAT Grade 6 (Level 12) Basic and CogAT Grade 6 (Level 12) Premium.

PREMIUM CogAT Test practice above

What is in the CogAT practice tests?

Our CogAT practice tests contain 3 test batteries:

  1. Verbal Battery– verbal classification, sentence completion, verbal analogies.
  2. Quantitative Battery –  quantitative relations, number series, equation building.
  3. Non-Verbal Battery – figure classification, figure analogies, figure analysis.

PREMIUM CogAT Test practice above

What is the purpose of the CogAt? Well, the CogAT test is:

Unlike assessment tests which measure what a student has already learned

Also used to determine whether a child has any other special talents. For example, for gifted and talented programmes in the US

That said, United States primary schools primarily use this method for testing students who are between grades K and 12.

Used to determine the reasoning abilities of a child and compares his or her progress to children of the same age and group.

When is the CogAT gifted child’s school assessment used?

The COgAt is used in gifted children assessment programs. The CogAt specifically can help gifted children to:

  • Find peers who have similar pursuits;
  • Fit in better than in general classrooms.
  • Feel better and they comfortable about socialising and thereby making new friends.

CogAT Test administration

  • Verbal battery tests have a picture or verbal analogies and classification and sentence completion.
  • Quantitative battery has number analogies and series and picture classification.
  • Non-verbal battery comprises of figure matrices and figures classification and paper folding.
  • Accessible to both English speaking students as well as non-English speaking students.

CCAT test practice

What are the different CogAT test levels?

There are 14 levels of tests and each is suitable for a different grade of student. The test materials are different for different levels. For example, a grade 4 student will never get the same questions as a level 9 student. Here, the levels reflect the ages. So, level 5 means the child is 5 years old. The first level of the test is for age 5 or 6, which is kindergarten level. The child appearing for the kindergarten-level test will thus be at least 5 or 6 years old and no more than 6 years old. If the child is older than 6, then he or she will have to take a more advanced test.

There is no syllabus-specific question and if a child is comfortable with more cognitive skills then they will perform better in the test. Most of the time, the students who do very well on these tests are considered gifted. Experts, however, have disagreed with this.

One set of a student’s CogAT test results cannot determine their future. Nonetheless, predictive data on a student’s progress and how far they can achieve can be determined from this test.

CCAT test practice

CogAT test practice question formats

The students have to identify how two different pictures or concepts are related. This will use images or words or both and the level of explanation in the question will depend on the level of the test the child is taking. This section will consist of 14 questions and the child will get no more than 15 minutes to answer this section.

The questions might take the following form. A calf is to a cow what a foal is to a ____; the options will be sheep, horse, goat and pig. The child will have to select one of these four and proceed to the next section.

In the non-verbal part, there are:

  • Figure classifications.
  • 3 figures followed by a 4th in the answer section.
  • Ten minutes to answer 14 questions.
  • You need to work out the similarity.

Our gifted child assessment example

For example the New York City Gifted and Talented Test. The verbal sections involve testing the sense of taking directions, their aural reasoning, and arithmetic reasoning. The non-verbal questions assess the ability to complete a pattern, reasoning analogy, serial reasoning, and spatial visualisation too.

New York City Gifted and Talented Test (NYC G&T)

The children of New York City are assessed…

  • At ages 4 to 7 years for entering grades K-3.
  • Using Nonverbal questions are taken from the NNAT.
  • Plus, OLSAT-based oral questions
  • 48 non-verbal questions and 30 verbal questions.
  • Administration time of 30-60 minutes.

More Gifted child practice tests

We focus on GL Assessment’s CAT4 test specifically:

Other popular standardised cognitive tests

We offer many guides to the other popular standardised cognitive tests. Plus practice test materials for each one.

From School Entrance Tests, the Gifted education and Talented assessment specialists.

CogAT test practice

Thinking Skills Assessment practice

Watson Glaser

Welcome to our feature on the Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice. The Watson Glaser thinking skills test is a psychometric test which assesses your critical thinking skills.

 Rob Williams Assessment offer all types of practice psychometric test resources.

We hope you find our FREE Watson Glaser practice test and Watson glaser Test tips useful!

Try our Passing each Watson Glaser Test section guide too and THE Best Watson Glaser test practice available.

Examples for each Watson Glaser test section

The Watson Glaser test is the most widely used critical thinking test in the world. There are five Watson Glaser sections.

We go through introducing and sharing the instructions for each of these five ‘Watson Glaser subtests’ below. Starting with the first Inferences section.

Practice Watson Glaser Test Inferences.

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson Glaser Test’s Inferences section 

You’ll have to decide whether a follow-on statement is true based on a prior statement.

Again, you have a binary choice in your answer: pick ‘yes’ or ‘no’.

INFERENCES EXAMPLE 1

Firstly, if the lights are on in a house and music can be heard coming from the house, a person might infer that someone is at home. But this inference may or may not be correct. It is possible that the people of the house did not turn the lights and the radio off when they left the house.

You therefore need to reflect upon the following two key Watson Glaser critical reasoning skills:

  • How quickly can you draw conclusions from facts?
  • Can you make judgements based on limited information?

Inferences examples 2, 3, 4

Statement:
Two hundred school students in their early teens voluntarily attended a recent weekend student conference in Leeds. At this conference, the topics of race relations and means of achieving lasting world peace were discussed, since these were problems that the students selected as being most vital in today’s world.


Proposed Inferences:


1. As a group, the students who attended this conference showed a keener interest in broad social problems than do most other people in their early teens.

The correct answer is PT.

Since, most people in their early teens do not show so much serious concern with broad social problems.

2. The majority of the students had not previously discussed the conference topics in the schools.

The correct answer is PF.

Since, the students’ growing awareness of these topics probably stemmed at least in part from
discussions with teachers and classmates.

3. The students came from all parts of the country.

The correct answer is ID.

Since there is no evidence for this inference.

4. The students discussed mainly industrial relations problems.

The correct answer is F.

Since, it is given in the statement of facts that the topics of race relations and means of achieving world peace were the problems chosen for discussion. 

Practice Watson Glaser Test Recognition of Assumptions.

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Recognition of Assumptions section 

Below are a number of statements. Each statement is followed by several proposed assumptions. You are to decide for each assumption whether a person, in making the given statement, is really making that assumption i.e., taking it for granted, justifiably or not. If you think that the given assumption is taken for granted in the statement, mark ‘YES’ under ‘Assumption made’ in the proper place on the answer sheet. If you think the assumption is not necessarily taken for granted in the statement, mark ‘NO’ in the space under ‘Assumption made’. 

Practice Watson Glaser Test Deduction

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Deduction section 

In this test, each exercise consists of several statements (premises) followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, consider the statements in each exercise as true without exception. Read the first conclusion beneath the statements.

If you think it necessarily follows from the statements given, mark ‘YES’ under ‘Conclusion follows’ in the proper place on the Answer Sheet. If you think it is not a necessary conclusion from the statements given mark ‘NO’ under ‘Conclusion follows’, even though you may believe it to be true from your general knowledge. Similarly, read and judge each of the other conclusions.

Deduction examples

Statement: Some holidays are rainy. All rainy days are boring.


Proposed Conclusions:

1. No clear days are boring.

The answer is NO. Since the conclusion does not follow.

You cannot tell from the statements whether or not clear days are boring.

Some may be.

2. Some holidays are boring.

The answer is YES. Since the conclusion necessarily follows from the statements.

According to them, the rainy holidays must be boring.


3. Some holidays are not boring.

The answer is NO.

Since, the conclusion does not follow.

Even though you may know that some holidays are very pleasant.

Practice Watson Glaser Test’s Interpretation

INSTRUCTIONS for Watson glaser Test’s Logical Interpretation sub-test

Each of the following exercises consists of a short paragraph followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, assume that everything in the short paragraph is true.

The problem is to judge whether or not each of the proposed conclusions logically follows beyond a reasonable doubt from the information given in the paragraph.

If you think that the proposed conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt (even though it may not follow absolutely and necessarily), mark ‘YES’ under ‘Conclusion Follows’ in the proper place on the answer sheet. If you think that the conclusion does not follow beyond a reasonable doubt from the facts given, mark ‘NO’ under ‘Conclusion Follows’.

Interpretation examples

Statement: A study of vocabulary growth in children from eight months to six years old shows that the size
of spoken vocabulary increases from 0 words at age eight months to 2,562 words at age six years.

Proposed Conclusions:

1. None of the children in this study had learned to talk by the age of six months.

YES, the conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt since, according to the statement, the size of the spoken vocabulary at eight months was 0 words.


2. Vocabulary growth is slowest during the period when children are learning to walk.

NO, the conclusion does not follow as there is no information given that relates growth of vocabulary to walking.

Practice Watson Glaser Test Evaluation of Arguments

INSTRUCTIONS Evaluation of Arguments sub-test

  • Each Evaluation of Arguments question is followed by several arguments.
  • For the purpose of the Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments sub-test, you are to regard each argument as true.
  • The problem then is to decide whether it is a strong or a weak argument. For an argument to be strong, it must be both important and directly related to the question. Whereas an argument is weak if it is:
    • Not directly related to the question. Even though it may be of great general importance.
    • Or if it is of minor importance.
    • Or if it is related only to trivial aspects of the question.

Evaluation of Arguments examples

Statement: Should all young people in the United Kingdom go on to higher education?

Proposed Arguments:

1. Yes; college provides an opportunity for them to wear college scarves.

WEAK, this would be a silly reason for spending years in college.

2. No; a large percentage of young people do not have enough ability or interest to derive any benefit from college training.

STRONG. If it is true, as the directions require us to assume, it is a weighty argument against all young people going to college.

3. No; excessive studying permanently warps an individual’s personality.

WEAK, this argument, although of great general importance when accepted as true, is not directly.

What is Watson Glaser test?

The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, published by Pearson company Talent Lens, measures critical thinking skills and the capacity for solving problems.

Law firms and law schools all over the globe use Watson Glaser test results to sift out those prospectie lawyers with lesser critical thinking skills.

How is the Watson Glaser Test given?

  • The newer vision of the Watson Glaser test takes 40 minutes, whereas the older test requires 55 minutes.
  • It is crucial when taking the Watson Glaser to only use the information presented.
  • This is intentional since these legal recruitment must assesses such unbiased and objective thinking skills.

What are the 5 Watson Glaser sections?

:et’s start with this question: How many sections are in the Watson Glaser Test? There are five test sections in the Watson Glaser Test. As follows:

  1. ASSUMPTIONS.
  2. ANALYSING ARGUMENTS
  3. DEDUCTIONS
  4. INFERENCES
  5. INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS

Now let us consider each of these five Watson Glaser sub-tests in detail.

Plus how a lawyer demostrated the necessary critical reasoning skills needed to pass that Watson Glaser sub-test.

And then we will move on to consider how to pass each Watson Glaser sub-test.

Watson Glaser test practice

What is the Watson Glaser ASSUMPTIONS sub-test ?

The Watson glaser sub-test called Assumptions is all about recongising where assumptions have been made. Of course these are unstated. So in practice a criminal barrister needs to be able to spot assumptions that are being made in a criminal case. And to then bring such ‘unstated assumptions’ to the attention of the judge and jury.

What does the Watson Glaser ASSUMPTIONS sub-test look like?

  • Sets of statements are presented to the candidate.
  • Each Watson Glaser candidate must then determine whether each of these presented assumptions have been made by the passage.
  • Or not been assumed within the Watson Glaser Assumptions text passage.

Watson Glaser test practice

ANALYSING ARGUMENTS subtest

In this Watson Glaser sub-test, each argument presented to the Watson Glaser test-taker must be analysed. Then the list of points in favour and points against the contentious position must be reviewed.

This replicates how a lawyer must assess both the arguments they themselves use. Plus the arguments used against their own case.

What does the Watson Glaser ANALYSING ARGUMENTS sub-test look like?

  1. Watson Glaser candidates need to consider how relevant each argued point is to the original question posed.
  2. Then to determine whether each argued point is weak because it does not directly relate to the posed question, or strong because it does.

Watson Glaser test practice

DEDUCTIONS Watson Glaser sub-test

Here, Watson Glaser candidates need to determinie whether certain conclusions follow necessarily from the information presented in each Watson Glaser Deductions’ series of statements.

What does the Watson Glaser DEDUCTIONS sub-test look like?

Here, candidates evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose; determining if each deduction does or does follow on from the information in the passage.

Watson Glaser test practice

INFERENCES Watson Glaser test section

The Inferences sub-test of the Watson Glaser Test involves evaluating the validity of inferences. These are drawn from a series of factual statements.

What does the Watson Glaser ANALYSING ARGUMENTS sub-test look like?

In this Watson Glaser subtest, candidates are presented with a list of possible inferences from a passage; rating each one as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say from the information provided.

Watson Glaser test practice

INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS Watson Glaser sub-test

Here, in this Watson Glaser test section, candidates must analyse the ‘evidence’ provided in a passage of prose. This is similar to the critical reasoning processes described in the Inferences Watson Glaser sub-test section described above.

What does the Watson Glaser INTERPRETATION OF STATEMENTS sub-test look like?

Watson Glaser candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.

Watson Glaser test practice

So, what is the Watson Glaser’s Critical Reasoning?

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn.

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

Is the Watson Glaser an aptitude test?

Yes, it is an aptitude test; assessing your ability to think critically, evaluate arguments, recognise assumptions, assess strong and weak arguments and draw conclusions. 

Normally, you’ll have around 40 questions, split into five different sections: inference assessment, recognising assumptions, deduction interpretation and evaluation of arguments.

Questions will ask things like whether a statement is true or false, based on the information given.

What’s the pass mark?

There’s no set pass or fail mark. Assessment is based on a percentile basis compared to the rest of the applicants. You may receive your percentile score, but this depends on the firm to which you’re applying. 

What’s the time limit?

The test takes approximately 35-40 minutes to complete, either online or in paper-and-pencil format. Although, the amount of time you have depends on which law firm you’re applying to. The typical duration is 30 minutes, meaning you’ll have about 45 seconds to answer each question. However, each firm can give out their own deadlines.

How can I get extra time?

Legally, you are allowed to receive extra time to complete the Watson Glaser test if you specify a disability in advance. Hence, it’s important to contact the law firm and provide them with the relevant details ahead of time. 

How can I prepare for the Watson Glaser test?

To prepare for the Watson Glaser test, there are quite a few free practice tests available online, giving the chance to get a feel for it. If you want to practice more, there are others available online for a fee. It’s a good idea to try out as many practice tests as possible, to ensure you can complete it within the time limit.

Aside from practice tests, there are many simple ways you can prepare for the exam. The Watson Glaser test aims to assess your critical thinking skills, so it’s a good idea to practice this.

You can do this by reading articles or watching debates, and trying to think about the strength of the arguments. However, be sure to set personal biases aside when doing this. During the test, it’s vital that you answer the questions based on the information given, forgetting about information from elsewhere.

With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal critical reasoning test.

What are the Watson Glaser’s 5 sections?

The  critical reasoning questions in the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal are divided into five sections.

Each section’s type of critical verbal reasoning test is described below: 

1. Watson Glaser Test’s Recognition of Assumptions Section

Following each set of statements, this section asks the candidate whether any of a series of assumptions has been made by the passage, or not. 

2. Watson Glaser Test’s Evaluation of Arguments sub-test

 Each set of question in this Watson Glaser section starts with a contentious question. Or whether it is a strong argument because it does relate directly. 

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

3. Watson Glaser Test’s Deduction Section

Here, candidates must evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose. Then determine if each deduction does or does not follow on from the information in the passage. 

4. Inference section of the Watson Glaser Test

Candidates must rate each possible inference as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say. This analysis must be based each time only on the Watson Glaser information provided. Not from any other background or prior knowledge.

5. Evaluation of Arguments Watson Glaser SubTest

From the evidence within a passage of prose, candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.  

Critical Reasoning Test Introduction

  • Critical reasoning tests, such as the LNAT, ask you to identify assumptions, inferences and the points made within “overall” arguments.
  • It does not assess any knowledge of laws or any legal ability.
  • You need to answer 42 questions.

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn. With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal critical reasoning test.

What is critical reasoning?

Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn. With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal reasoning critical reasoning test.

How to prepare for Critical Thinking tests

These are a learned skill. With the right training, most individuals who have an average or above the ability to learn can develop reasonable critical thinking skills. Critical thinking skills include the ability to define a problem clearly, the ability to formulate and select relevant hypotheses and to judge the validity of inferences. A good grasp of these skills enables a person to ‘think on his feet’, to assess evidence and arguments and to communicate clearly.

Who uses critical reasoning skills?

Everyone uses these skills sometimes, but some job roles specifically require a high level of verbal critical reasoning. For example, many senior managerial and executive positions require you to assess evidence effectively and to communicate your position clearly.

Lawyers, in particular, need excellent critical reasoning skills. Barristers, for example, use critical reasoning to:

  • Remain objective and not to be prejudiced by their own opinions.
  • Analyze large amounts of verbal information to build a case for their client.
  • Identify the different ways legal doctrine can be interpreted.
  • Present their evidence in court and state their conclusion based on it.

A judge (or jury) will in turn use their critical reasoning skills to balance all the evidence for and against the accused and reach a verdict.

Journalists also need to have a high level of critical reasoning skills. When commenting on a current affairs debate, a journalist will typically present all sides of the argument. After careful thought, and backed up by evidence, they then commit their own analysis to the page.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

Deduction v Inference

It’s not just the person writing a newspaper article who needs to use critical reasoning skills – the person reading the article needs to apply their own critical reasoning skills too. An astute reader always asks: Does the writer’s overall conclusion follow on from the evidence and facts presented?

This question is an example of logical deduction or deductive reasoning – the linking of one or more statements, or premises, to make a logically sound conclusion.

On the other hand, inductive reasoning or inference, is based on discerning what is probable or what is likely to be true from true premises. Critical reasoning involves applying both inductive and deductive reasoning to arguments.

What kind of Watson Glaser questions are there?

Some questions will ask the candidate whether a statement is True or False, as per a verbal comprehension critical reasoning test. The inherent logic – or otherwise – of these arguments is critical reasoning tested. The presented evidence and facts need to be analysed and subtle shades of meaning interpreted.

There are three broad types of critical reasoning question, as seen in the practice critical reasoning tests in Part 2.

Interpretation-type questions:
  • Which sentence best summarizes the passage?
  • … word could be substituted for another in the passage?
  • Which of the following words is the most suitable replacement?
  • What is meant by the following term?
  • Which facts are included in the passage?
Summary-type questions:
  • What is the main point the passage is making?
  • Which of the following statements best summarizes the second paragraph?
  • … statement best summarises what the author is saying in the last paragraph?
  • Which of these statements does not form part of the passage’s argument?

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test and our Watson Glaser Practice

Assumptions and Deductions:
  • What can be inferred about X from the passage?
  • Which of the following can be deduced from the passage?
  • … of the following assumptions is made in the passage?
  • Which statements lend support to the passage’s argument?
  • … of these opinions is expressed by the author?

Improving the speed with which you can digest complex prose will help your critical reasoning test performance. Read the passage quickly the first time to get a feel for the main points. Then read the passage a second time more carefully, mentally noting the key content of each paragraph. Focus on the core of the argument and its supporting evidence, together with the author’s stance on the issue.

Watson-Glaser practice

While you need to absorb the critical reasoning test passages as efficiently as possible, that does not mean that you need to rush your answers. Quite the opposite, since there will be many different question formats. It is very important to double check that you are 100% clear on what the question is asking for.

To pass a critical reasoning critical reasoning test you need to understand the development of an argument – in particular, what points provide factual support. Reading commentary on political, social and economic debates will certainly improve your understanding.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

How can I pass my critical reasoning test?

As you read such material, ask yourself:

– How are individual’s opinions, counteracts and factual evidence expressed.

– Is there one or more argument? One or more conclusion?

– Is each piece of information reliable? Would you draw the same conclusion yourself.

– What additional information would you need to frame a counterargument?

-Do not let your own general knowledge lead you astray. It’s vital that you do not let any of your personal opinions or your general knowledge influence your answers even slightly. This recommendation applies even if it seems that the correct answer is in direct contradiction to what you know or believe to be true.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

Critical reasoning test tips

To summarise,these are the skills you need to demonstrate to succeed on a critical reasoning critical reasoning test:

  • Identifying statements that are untrue.
  • Separating facts from inferences and opinions.
  • Identifying the implications of a factual statement.
  • Making logical deductions from a passage of prose.

Everyone uses these skills sometimes, but some job roles specifically require a high level of verbal critical reasoning. For example, many senior managerial and executive positions require you to assess evidence effectively and to communicate your position clearly.

Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test – Watson Glaser Practice

Lawyers, in particular, need excellent critical reasoning skills. Barristers, for example, need to employ a wide range of critical reasoning skills. Such as thefollowing:

  • Remaining objective and unbiased.
  • Analyzing large amounts of verbal information to build a case for their client.
  • Identifying different legal interpretations.
  • Presenting their evidence in court.
  • Stating their conclusion based on that evidence.

A judge (or jury) will, in turn, use their critical reasoning skills to balance all the evidence for and against the accused and reach a verdict.

Similarly, journalists also need to have a high level of critical reasoning skills. When commenting on a current affairs debate, a journalist will present all sides of the argument. After careful thought, and backed up by evidence, they then commit their own analysis to the page.

Watson Glaser Test summary features

Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal® Critical Thinking Test Study II The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal® (published by another Pearson company Talent Lens) measures critical thinking skills and the capacity for solving problems. The test takes approximately 35-40 minutes to complete, either online or in paper-and-pencil format. It is most commonly used for student selection and for either managerial selection, or identifying senior managerial potential. The  critical reasoning questions in the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal are divided into five sections. Each section’s type of critical verbal reasoning test is described below: SUBTEST QUESTION FORMAT Assumptions Set of statements and to ask the candidate whether any of a series of assumption has been made by the passage, or not. Analysing Arguments The argument that has to be analysed is a contentious question given at the outset of this section of the Watson-Glaser. It is followed by a list of points in favour and points against the contentious position. Candidates need to consider how relevant each argued point is to the original question posed. Then to determine whether each argued point is weak because it does not directly relate to the posed question, or strong because it does. Deductions Here, candidates evaluate a set of deductions from a passage of prose; determining if each deduction does or does follow on from the information in the passage. Inferences In this subtest, candidates are presented with a list of possible inferences from a passage; rating each one as true, false, possibly true, possibly false or whether they cannot say from the information provided. Interpreting Information: From the evidence within a passage of prose, candidates must decide if each of a series of conclusions follows on logically from the presented information.    

What must I always remember to pass the Watson Glaser Test?

As with all critical reasoning test questions, it is imperative that answers are based only on the information presented. One of the reasoning skills being assessed is objective decision-making; without any bias from your own background knowledge, opinions and beliefs. You will not be required to utilise any prior knowledge when answering a question, and at times the correct answer will completely contradict what you know to be true based on your own knowledge, but is true in the context of the passage. you may have already formed opinions and have your own understanding of the facts of the matter at hand. It becomes even more important than usual with this type of verbal test to only base your answers on the information provided in the passage. You will most probably find yourself thinking of the knowledge that you already have on the subject of a passage.

Good luck with your Watson Glaser test!

Watson Glaser Practice Tests

CAT4 sample tests

CAT4 Test Training Videos

Welcome to our CAT4 Practice Tests and CAT 4 training videos.

Here is School Entrance Tests‘s CAT4 practice tests:

bookPREMIUM CAT4 practice papers schoolBUY VIDEO or MARK GUIDES

In summary, the above CAT4 premium practice papers offer you comprehensive and accurate practice materials. Each of these CAT4 levels practice will effectively prepare your child for the CAT4 exam.

Five CAT4 Practice Papers at each Level A to G

Each of these levels include:

  • Full-length CAT4 simulations
  • CAT4 quizzes.
  • Detailed CAT4 question explanations, and
  • CAT4 study guides.

Firstly, 9+ CAT4 LEVEL A PRACTICE and 10+ CAT4 LEVEL B.

Secondly, 11+ CAT4 Level C PRACTICE ; 12+ CAT4 Level D PRACTICE and 13+ CAT4 Level E practice.

And then for 14-15 year-olds CAT4 Level F Practice Test 1 to Practice Test Paper 5.

Finally, 16+ / 17+ CAT4 Level G Practice Test.

Our FREE CAT4 preparation resources

Explaining CAT4 Percentile Scores and what does a low CAT4 score mean?

How can I pass CAT4? CAT4 Scoring explained together with what is in a CAT4 Report.

Planning your CAT4 test practice step-by-step

Or if the CAT4 test practice is unsuitable then you will find our extensive School Entrance exam practice tests here.

  1. Establish How to interprete a CAT 4 results report.
  2. Learn what the different CAT 4 sections look like.
  3. Practice with the correct year CAT 4 test for your own child.

Sample CAT 4 sample

Here is our free CAT4 paper sample.

CAT4 parents guides

Do try our CAT4 test practice and parents guide to the CAT4.

Why do schools use the CAT 4?

The CAT4 tests range was published a decade ago. GL Education‘s CAT 4 assessment series has become increasingly popular, especially for streaming. Other popular CAT 4 applications are to:

  • Explore academic potential. More specifically, the CAT4 assessments
  • Create uniformity and consistency across each primary/secondary school’s year group
  • Benchmark internationally any individual pupils’ attainment
  • Reveal any disparity between a CAT4 test-taker’s ability and school achievement to date.
  • Whenever there’s inappropriate progress, then further CAT4 analysis is required. Or immediate curriculum changes.

The education publisher, GL Education’s CAT4 YouTube videos are worth selectively reviewing. As are School Enrtance Tests CAT 4 videos below:

Cognitive ability testing with GL Education’s CAT4

GL Education’s Cognitive Abilities Test (CAT4) and LASS help the school ensure that every child achieves their potential in the classroom.

The CAT4’s verbal, non-verbal, quantitative and spatial ability tasks are used as a starting point to provide teachers with information on children’s:

  • Strengths;
  • Learning preferences; and
  • Weaknesses.

GL Education recommends that any school using the CAT4 analyses those CAT4 results on a regular basis. Such CAT4 analyses should then be discussed at a CAT4 progress meeting. Attainment CAT4-related questions include,

  • Who is achieving in line with their individual CAT4 predictions?
  • Who’s not achieving as per their CAT4 predicted results?
  • Do the school’s CAT4 results exhibit any gender bias. If so, how should the school respond?

For those attainment areas that are lower than the CAT4  predicts, a school should then implement an ‘graduated response’ strategy.

If attainment isn’t aligned with CAT4 scores or there is a discrepancy of more than 20 points between the individual strands of CAT4, the school applies their

GL Education consultants follow a well-established flow chart, which includes appropriate cognitive assessments, like GL Education’s CAT4.

Educational targets are shared with parents; with any confidential info held by counsellors marked as such on those children’s folder (with emotional or social concerns).

How should I prepare for the CAT4?

Well, here’s how GL Assessment introduce their CAT4:

Which skills does the CAT4 assess?

The CAT4 requires knowledge of Literacy skills , Numeracy skills and Abstract reasoning skills.

<  <  Youtube video explaining the different CAT4 levels for different school age groups  >   >

What are the CAT4 spatial reasoning test questions like?

In the CAT4 spatial reasoning questions you have to manipulate 2D and 3D shapes. So similar to the non-verbal reasoning questions in that sense.
You need to identify each of the different set of shapes’ patterns. In other words the relationships between them. How they relate to each other.

Explaining CAT4 questions on 2D shape combinations

CAT4 TEST INSTRUCTIONS – Find which shapes can be combined to create the full picture you’ve been presented with in each CAT4 spatial reasoning question.

Take a look at this example question. Which of the options below, makes up the top shape?

Spatial-reasoning-test

Explaining CAT4 questions on Analysing the Mirror Image Matching 2D Shapes

CAT4 TEST INSTRUCTIONS – Find which two shapes are identical in each CAT4 spatial reasoning question.

Regardless of the perspective / angle shown, identify which two 2D shapes are equivalent.

Explaining CAT4 questions on Analysing the Mirror Image

CAT4 TEST INSTRUCTIONS – Find the exact mirror image for each CAT4 spatial reasoning question.

spatial reasoning practice test

Explaining CAT4 questions requiring 3D Cube construction

CAT4 TEST INSTRUCTIONS – Find for each CAT4 spatial reasoning question:

  • The marking which is the exact opposite of the one that is presented in the question.  
  • or if it’s a flattened out 3D cube, then you must choose which of the answer options represents the fully reconstructed cube. So, when in three dimensions in other words.
spatial reasoning practice

CAT4 test practice

Explaining CAT4 question types involving Solid 2D and 3D shapes

INSTRUCTIONS – Find for each CAT4 spatial reasoning question, you must determine which 3D shape is equivalent to the unmade one presented. So, in other words, which of the folded up shapes is represented by the unfolded shape in the questions.

Spatial reasoning test

Other free CAT4 test practice resources

CAT4 test – CAT 4 – CAT practice test – CAT test year 7

TSA


Welcome to our TSA pratice tests. The Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) is primarily used by both Cambridge and Oxford University to select graduate or scholarship candidate.

How do I register for the TSA?

Our TSA practice test papers

Well, here’s two useful lists covering

How should I take Thinking Skills practice tests?

The following Oxford University courses will require you to take both the Thinking Skills Assessment and an additional 30-minute Writing Test:

School Entrance TestsUniversity admissions tests guides

What does the TSA assess?

The Thinking Skills Assessment evaluates candidate’s ability to organise ideas in a clear and concise manner and communicate them effectively in writing. Questions are not subject-specific and candidates must answer one question from a choice of four.

The Thinking Skills Assessment practice consists of the two elements of the Thinking Skills Assessment.

Which skills does the TSA test?

  • Problem-solving skills:
    • Numerical reasoning.
    • Spatial reasoning.
  • Critical thinking skills:
    • Understanding arguments.
    • Reasoning with everyday language.
Critical thinking and problem solving are included in the World Economic Forum’s report

 

Why is the Thinking Skills Assessment fundamental to your educational success?

The TSA is a

  • Pre-interview assessment for Oxford and Cambridge.
  • 90-minute Section 1 paper
  • 50 multiple-choice questions.
  • Average time required to answer each question is 1.8 mins.
  • The CTA is a non-calculator test.
  • It is administered by local test centres nationwide.

Books in a pile for situational judgement test tips (1)

We offer Thinking Skills Assessment practice.

Free TSA practice

TSA Specimen Test Oxford – Cambridge Assessment

Past Papers (2020)

Thinking Skills Assessment practice from 2019

2018 Past Papers Thinking Skills Assessment practice


TSA Past Papers (2017)

TSA 2017 Section 1
2017 Section 1 Answers
​​​Section 2
2017 Thinking Skills Assessment practice


Thinking Skills Assessment Past Papers (2016)

TSA 2016 Section 1
2016 Section 1 Answers
​​​Section 2
2016 Thinking Skills Assessment practice

2013 Thinking Skills Assessment Past Papers 2012

2011 Thinking Skills Assessment Past Papers 2010

  1. Oxford 2010 Section 1
  2. TSA Oxford 2010 Section 1 answer Oxford 2010 Section 1 score conversion

2009 Thinking Skills Assessment Past Papers 2008

Thinking Skills Assessment practice

Our Practice Aptitude Test Books

  • Passing Verbal Reasoning practice test book. This is regularly featured in Amazon’s top ten study guide. It includes a section on LNAT and other critical thinking tests.

 

Financial Personality online private tuition tools

Aptitude

Numerical Reasoning Test tips

Many medium-sized and large companies now use Numerical Reasoning Tests as part of their standard recruitment processes. A standardised Numerical Reasoning Test gives everyone the same numerical reasoning questions.

If you can’t find what you are looking for here, then we suggest reviewing the full range of aptitude practice tests here.

Our numerical reasoning test book 

Why test numerical reasoning?

Numerical Reasoning Tests need to accommodate the very wide difference in mathematical ability from school leavers to senior managers.  Correspondingly there is a range of increasingly difficult Numerical Reasoning Tests from the basic Numeracy Tests (which only require mathematical knowledge of the 4 basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) to the most complex and numerical reasoning involved in the interpretation of complex statitistical data.

Continue reading Aptitude
CAT4 practice tests

UK and US Psychometric test practice

We offer three types of test practice. As follows:

  • Firstly, free psychometric practice tests (on our site) and
  • Secondly, Brain Training practice, which some research has shown to improve your memory/ Also, our premium game based assessment practice.
  • Thirdly, premium psychometric practice tests (listed here by profession; by employer and by psychometric test type.

Free psychometric test practice

Other Armed Services Practice Tests

Here is our How to Pass Army Tests ; and then next our Our Army aptitude test design process; plus also there is our  Army situational judgement test design; And finally our Army Practice Test.

Then next is our Navy Aptitude Test Practice and also there is our RAF Aptitude Test Practice.

Our other psychometric test practice at this Armed Services level

Here is our Practice Literacy Test and practice Numeracy Test.

Army Numerical Reasoning book reviews

Buy this book to pass!

Brilliant book. Read it from cover to cover. Don’t skip the chapters. I know it can seem patronising, the way he breaks it down, but I’d recommend reading it through.

Brilliantly practical and informative

Very clear layout to follow, questions advance over the …

Very clear layout to follow, questions advance over the chapters and it sets a steady pace. This book helped me immensely to get all the practice I needed within 3 days.

A really useful book 

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Best free UCAT test practice designed by experts

Welcome to our UCAT tips and UCAT practice tests.

  Interested in medicine or dentistry? 

Then you need to be prepared for the UCAT test. Keep reading for pro tips, advice and strategies to help you prepare for (and pass) the UKCAT admissions exam.

The UCAT (United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test) is the exam you need to pass if you want to study medicine or dentistry at most UK universities.

We offer premium UCAT test practice, secondly free UCAT Situational Judgement Test Practice below and thirdly free UCAT aptitude test practice.

UK UCAT Universities In The UK

These are the thirty UK Medical Schools requiring the UCAT:

  1. University of Aberdeen. They will combine your subtest scores and then give you an application score on how your performance compares with all other applicants. There is no cut-off score and for 2021 entry the lowers score for interview invitation was 2,370 for home students.
  2. Anglia Ruskin University. You need at least Band 3 in SJT. You’ll be ranked by score and the top-scorers will be invited for interview.
  3. Aston University. All SJT bands are accepted and your UCAT score counts for 1/3 of the shortlisting process. Your academic qualifications account for the remaining 2/3.
  4. University of Birmingham. UCAT represents 35% of your application score. Applicants are put into deciles and scored on UCAT performance.
  5. Bristol University. This UCAT university gives your score 100% weighting. For 2020 entry, applicants scoring above 2,690 were invited to interview.
  6. Cardiff University. Your score may be used but they don’t give any details about how.
  7. Dundee University. Your score will be used alongside academic ability, but they don’t outline how.
  8. University of East Anglia. This UCAT uni says: “a high score is advantageous; however, a low score does not disqualify an applicant from consideration.” For 2020 entry the lowest score of someone who got an interview was 1,980.
  9. Edge Hill University. You’ll be ranked by your score and the top-scorers will be interviewed. Anyone with Band 4 SJT will be automatically rejected.
  10. University of Edinburgh. You’ll be put into deciles and given a score that’s combined with your academic score. You’ll be rejected if you get Band 4 in SJT.
  11. Exeter University. UCAT counts for 25% of shortlisting with academic performance counting for 75%.
  12. University of Glasgow. This UCAT university doesn’t look at your SJT score but will allocate interviews based on UCAT performance.
  13. Hull York Medical School. You’ll get scored out of 40 for your UCAT score and out of 30 for your GCSE results. Up to 15 points are allocated for your SJT banding.
  14. Keele University. You have to meet a cut-off score (previously 2,280) and get at least Band 3 in SJT to be considered.
  15. Kent and Medway Medical School. You have to get at least Band 3 in SJT and meet the cut-off score (previously 2,470) to be considered.
  16. King’s College London. This UCAT uni says your UCAT score and A-Level performance are the most important. They average out your score rather than look at individual subtest scores and they do take SJT bandings into account.
  17. University of Leicester. Your score is exactly half of the shortlisting process and if you get Band 4 or score in the bottom two deciles, you’ll be automatically rejected. If you meet the GCSE requirements and score in the top 5 deciles, you’ll get an interview invite.
  18. Liverpool University. If you get Band 4 in SJT you’ll be rejected. Applicants with the most competitive UCAT scores will be shortlisted for interview.
  19. University of Manchester. This UCAT uni has a cut-off score and if it’s a high-scoring year then you’ll be ranked by your scores. Applicants are grouped into similar educational and socio-demographic backgrounds and assessed against each other. They say that people with Band 1 & 2 in SJT are most likely to get an interview.
  20. Newcastle University. You’ll be assessed by your UCAT score and the threshold for interview in 2021 entry was 2,820.
  21. University of Nottingham. You’ll get given points for your score, with verbal reasoning getting double points – but you need at least Band 3 in SJT to be considered.
  22. Plymouth University. This UCAT university uses a cut-off score, which was 2,400 for 2021 entry.
  23. Queen Mary University of London. Your UCAT score is given equal weighting to your grades and you’ll be ranked by combined performance.
  24. Queen’s University Belfast. You’ll get points for your UCAT score and SJT will be ignored except for deciding on borderline applicants.
  25. University of Sheffield. You have to meet a cut-off score (2,430 for 2022 entry) and SJT is considered as part of the interview assessment.
  26. Southampton University. You’ll be ranked by your score but your SJT banding is ignored.
  27. University of St Andrews. This UCAT uni ranks you by score and you must be within the top global 400 scorers to get shortlisted.
  28. St George’s, University of London. You’ll be ranked by score and there is a cut-off, although SJT isn’t considered. For 2022 entry the cut-off was 500 in each subtest.
  29. University of Sunderland. You must be within the top 8 deciles and Band 3 or above to be considered.
  30. Warwick Uni. If you score above the national mean in verbal reasoning, you’ll move to the next stage of shortlisting. You’ll then get points for your UCAT score, so the higher you score, the higher your chances of getting an interview. For 2019 entry the lowest score of an interviewee was 2,570.

The few UK Universities that don’t require the UCAT as part of their admissions criteria, require the BMAT instead.

NHS Jobs Search

Welcome to our latest, updated NHS jobs search – – ALL ROLES – – ALL LEVELS and UCAT practice tests.

Plus we offer a values match test of your suitability for working within the HEALTHCARE sector.Your personalized feedback will show how closely your personal values match those required within the NHS.

Practice UCAT Entrance test materials

Let’s start with a list of all our free UCAT practice tests: UCAT verbal reasoning test practice; Quantitative reasoning test practice; UCAT Decision Analysis test practice; Situational judgement test practice; and the UCAT abstract reasoning test practice.

FREE UCAT Quantitative reasoning tests 

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning UKCAT Test Practice 1.

Quantitative Reasoning UCAT Test Practice 2.

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Test Practice 3.

Quantitative Reasoning UCAT Test Practice 4.

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Practice Test Answers.

Quantitative Reasoning Practice UCAT Test 2 answers.

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Practice Test 3 answers.

Quantitative Reasoning Practice UCAT Test 4 answers.

More UCAT relevant Aptitude Test practice for each UCAT subtest

The UCAT requires several aptitude tests to be practiced.

The UCAT subtests include verbal reasoning, which helps to evaluate information presented in a written form exclusively. Another subtest is on decision making, which evaluates one’s ability to make sound decisions and judgments using exclusive data.

The UCAT Abstract reasoning test addresses both convergent and divergent thinking concerning a piece of particular information. The above tests are allocated specific durations.

The following four aptitude tests and situational judgement test which are included in the UKCAT assess the following medical reasoning skills:

1) UKCAT Quantitative reasoning test intro

This assesses the ability to evaluate numerical info presented in the form of tables, charts and graphs. This test assesses the use of numerical reasoning to solve problems. Specifically, knowing which information to use and how to manipulate numerical data using simple calculations.

2) UKCAT Verbal reasoning test intro

This assesses applicants’ ability to read and critically evaluate written info. Specifically, to quickly assess the content of written passages and the accuracy of the conclusions drawn.

3) UKCAT Abstract reasoning test intro

This assesses the ability to find patterns in the abstract shape information presented. Both convergent and divergent thinking are assessed. You need to track pattern changes, generate hypotheses about which features are changing; and test these hypotheses.

4) UKCAT Decision analysis test intro

This assesses applicants’ ability to make decisions based on complex coded information. Specifically, making complex decisions when faced with ambiguous, uncertain situations.

5) UKCAT situational judgment test intro

This assesses capacity to firstly identify the critical factors in real-life, medical scenarios. Secondly, to use logical reasoning skills to determine how best to deal with these SJT scenarios.

The UCAT subtests include verbal reasoning, which helps to evaluate information presented in a written form exclusively. Another subtest is on decision making, which evaluates one’s ability to make sound decisions and judgments using exclusive data.

The UCAT Abstract reasoning test addresses both convergent and divergent thinking concerning a piece of particular information. The above tests are allocated specific durations

Premium UCAT test practice

Jobs in Science. UCAT practice tests. Medical professional with stethoscope and tablet in hospital.

UCAT Situational Judgement Test tips

– The new UKCAT SJT test format means you can give the same rating to all response options. If, for example, two were Inappropriate and two were Appropriate that’s fine.

– The timeframe is very important to the correct answer. Consider how appropriate each response option is to both the short-term and to the long-term.

– Even when there are 4 response options this does not mean that one is Very Appropriate, Appropriate, Inappropriate and Very Inappropriate.

 

UCAT Decision making sample question – UCAT example one

Which shape will make the last equation true?

A. Cross

B. Diamond

C. Crescent

D. Octagon

ANSWER

To answer this question, you would need to replace the set of shape equations with variables. For example: cross = x, Diamond = y, Crescent = z, Octagon = w.

If you work out the equations correctly, you’d find that ? = z, which means a square will make the last equation true.

UCAT Abstract reasoning sample question – UCAT example two

Which of the following test shapes belongs in set B?

ANSWER

This question is best worked out with a process of elimination.

A is incorrect because the black rectangle must branch off to both a black heart and a white heart.

B is incorrect because the black heart must branch off to a rectangle and a triangle of the same colour.

C is incorrect because the white triangle should not branch off to anything.

Whats the UCAT?

This is a test of aptitude and professional behaviour, not medical knowledge.

It’s designed to assess a range of different skills necessary in the medical field, including:

  • Communication
  • Problem solving
  • Numeracy
  • Spatial awareness
  • Integrity
  • Empathy
  • Teamwork

The idea is that the higher your UKCAT score is, the better your potential to successfully train as a doctor or dentist.

Currently, 30 universities in the United Kingdom include the UKCAT as part of their selection process for medical and dentistry programs. 

Whats the official UCAT site?

Here is the official UCAT website.

Other University admissions test practice

Medical school UCAT test practice resources

UCAT tips

SHL practice tests. Coloured pages of book for practice.

SHL Practice Tests

Welcome to our SHL practice tests; SHL are the publisher of the OPQ in the UK, and globally.

PwC’s SHL psychometric tests

PwC uses SHL (CEB) test provider for their psychometric tests – the online reasoning tests are highly effective to filter to the best 10% of applications, from the several thousand they receive per role.

Continue reading SHL Practice Tests
English writing skills with English books and pencils.

Refresh your basic English literacy skills

English writing is a skill you will use throughout your education. In Primary school, Secondary school, College and University. While in education, your English writing skills will usually be used in writing essays.

Throughout your education, previous jobs and job applications, you will have been judged on your English skills. Getting your thoughts down on paper, the accuracy of your spelling and grammar. Also, how well you can engage your ‘reader’.

Continue reading Refresh your basic English literacy skills
Literacy practice. Girl on lawn reading book

Literacy practice tests

In this section, there are useful Literacy practice tests and verbal reasoning tips. We pride ourselves on offering free practice test resources, including literacy test tips.

We hope that you find these literacy test tips useful!

Free Literacy Skills Test Practice

Firstly, LITERACY Practice Questions –

Secondly, LITERACY Practice Test Type 2 Questions.

Thirdly, LITERACY Practice Test Type 3 Questions.

Fourthly, LITERACY Practice Test Type 4 Questions.

We hope that you enjoy all our free Literacy skills test practice, literacy test practice, literacy test tips.

Our Top literacy tips

  • Make a mental note of words and phrases that indicate a cause and effect. For example, you may be asked to interpret statements with ’cause and effect’ words. For example, since, because, therefore, so, thus, due to, and as a result.
  • Words such as possibly, perhaps or maybe imply that there is a possibility of something happening. Be wary of treating conjecture or speculation as a definite outcome. For example, certain would mean one thing in a question. If coupled in the passage with the word almost, then the meaning is quite different.
  • The best way to prepare for a verbal reasoning test is to do practise questions that closely mirror the actual test you’ll be taking. But there are also many everyday ways you can improve your verbal reasoning skills. For example reading a wide range of challenging books, newspapers and magazines.

QTS Literacy test practice. Young teacher at a table helping two girls

Our improving Literacy tips

As part of the long-term strategy, and from a very early age, I would strongly recommend encouraging your child to read. I believe that this advice applies to every child, whether they are hoping to go to grammar school or not, but it becomes especially important with regard to the 11 Plus.

ENGLISH 10-MIN TESTS

SATs Grammar Practice

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How to improve your written English language skills

VERBAL REASONING 10-MIN TESTS

11Plus Verbal Reasoning Test 2. Child showing hands full of writing.

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Test 2

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Test 1. Man with letters all around

Verbal Reasoning Test 1 for the 11 plus

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Test. Candidates writing test in exam venue

11 Plus Verbal Quiz 3

CLOZE Verbal Reasoning Tests. Girl with glasses on her head resting her arms on a stack of books

CLOZE Verbal Reasoning 11 plus Test

Read more challenging books!

Reading allows your child to expand his or her vocabulary beyond the typical range of topics; as the old adage goes, reading truly does broaden the mind. The 11 Plus has been known to feature words like ‘dormitory’, which are challenging because they are slightly old fashioned.

Unless your child is one of a small minority that goes to boarding school, he or she is very unlikely to have come across this word in everyday speech. Unless of course, your child has read Harry Potter. Whether it be the latest instalment of Percy Jackson or something nonfiction, (We would recommend the Horrible History series for some light-hearted factual reading) as long as your child is engaged in the subject, reading will always be a useful exercise, and hopefully, a fun and enriching one.

In general it’s better to allow your child to choose his or her own reading material, as it will ultimately become frustrating if they come to see reading as a chore.

How Do I Get My Child to Read More?

Reading is such a fundamental starting block for any learning. It is the main channel for learning in most schools or educational settings and a necessity for future academic achievement in mainstream education.

Children are however not always ready for the world of reading by the time they go to school. The reason for this is as important as the solution. Some of these reasons or causes for why they may not be susceptible to the world of reading are exactly what you need to identify in order to find the best solutions.

A younger sibling might feel intimidated by the reading ability of the older. Best solutions would include reading separately with the younger sibling to build their confidence.

Sample aptitude questions

GL Assessment offer a popular school progress test called the CAT4 which assesses all of the following skills:

11+ English Papers Practice Tips

Another question format asks you to suggest summary headings. Analyse the main point(s) of the paragraph objectively. What key point should be highlighted? Don’t be misled by something that’s only mentioned once in a single phrase or sentence. It can be helpful, particularly if you are short of time, to focus on the first and last sentences in a paragraph. This is where you are likely to find the topic sentence. In a well-written paragraph, the topic sentence summarises the paragraph’s main point.

11+ English Papers Practice and Tips DeskYour understanding will be tested in many different ways, including:

  • Presenting the same information in a different way
  • Identifying the key points
  • Distinguishing between what is portrayed as fact and fiction
  • Inferences
  • Deductions

aptitude test practice

For each passage, you need to consider both the overall meaning and the detail. To assess the bigger picture, ask yourself questions such as: What is the main message? Who is the intended audience? When reflecting on the passage’s detail ask yourself: What are the facts? What’s the most important information in a passage?

Our aptitude test practice books

Rob Williams’s five practice aptitude tests books are all available on Amazon.

Firstly, in our opinion, this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

Secondly, in our opinion this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests

More literacy test tips

English Practice Tip 1 – Summarising the main points that the passage makes.

Practice Tip 2 – Evaluating whether statements are supported, contradicted, or implied by the information in the passage.

– Placing statements based on the passage into set categories.

– Putting sentences about a passage describing sequential events into the correct order.

  • Don’t rush to answer questions without referring back to the passage. Even if you think that you know the answer without looking it’s always worth double checking. First, check against the question and then against the passage.
  • You need to be one hundred percent happy with your answer. If it isn’t quite what you were looking for then it is probably wrong.

QTS Literacy test practice. Children at table with teacher.

Literacy Test Practice – Punctuation Test Tips

Punctuation questions on literacy tests measure your ability to apply effective punctuation to set passages. Accurate punctuation is a key element of written communication. Badly punctuated writing is like a road without road markings – it is all too easy for the reader to get lost and confused.

Your understanding of English punctuation will be tested in many different ways. Usually, you will be presented with a block of text with missing or incorrect punctuation. You need to highlight each punctuation error and also where missing punctuation should be inserted.

Literacy Skills Test Practice

Typically, there’s a block of all the possible punctuation marks and the letters of the alphabet on-screen. You will drag the correct punctuation from this block to its position in the passage.

Literacy Skills Test Practice – Grammar

Grammar questions on literacy tests measure your ability to use good grammar. This is in our opinion, an essential component of effective written and spoken communication

Your understanding of English grammar may be tested in many different ways, using grammar questions on literacy tests.

Typically, you need to select the correct phrase or sentence to insert into a short passage. You will be given a choice of several choices, only one of which is grammatically correct. In the practice questions below, identify which sentence is grammatically correct.

QTS Literacy test practice. Person writing at a table.

Advice about Learning to Read

  • A child may not be developmentally ready for reading. Ways to help with this is to
    • Make sure your child knows their sounds. This can be tricky as English is not a phonetical language. Find games, whether on screen or paper to help them learn the rules. Teach Your Monster To Read has been a favourite for us.
    • Start off with pictures, discussing the story told by these and developing a curiosity for the story and expressing themselves in language.
    • Follow your child’s reading with your finger to give them a point to focus on.
    • Find stories that interest them. Whether they are into dinosaurs or princesses. Topics that interest them is the key.

Always remember not to put pressure on your child to start reading. We all do things in our own time, but a negative feeling towards reading can last a lifetime. Instead, focus on creating a love for readingby reading them stories from a young age. When they are ready they will want to carry on finding the stories they love. Children will more readily follow what you do, so also make sure to show them that you make time to read.

There are several different questions types that you might encounter in the comprehension test. One question format asks you to identify the particular audience that a passage or extract is aimed at. Go with your instinct. Think about the reading level and tone. Does it sound like school policy to you? Does it read as though it is information for teachers? Is the piece’s reading level accessible to pupils?

Learning to Read

Reading is such a fundamental starting block for any learning. It is the main channel for learning in most schools or educational settings and a necessity for future academic achievement in mainstream education.

Children are however not always ready for the world of reading by the time they go to school. The reason for this is as important as the solution. Some of these reasons or causes for why they may not be susceptible to the world of reading are exactly what you need to identify in order to find the best solutions.

A younger sibling might feel intimidated by the reading ability of the older. Best solutions would include reading separately with the younger sibling to build their confidence.

Learning to read tips

  • A child may not be developmentally ready for reading. Ways to help with this is to
    • Make sure your child knows their sounds. This can be tricky as English is not a phonetical language. Find games, whether on screen or paper to help them learn the rules. Teach Your Monster To Read has been a favourite for us.
    • Start off with pictures, discussing the story told by these and developing a curiosity for the story and expressing themselves in language.
    • Follow your child’s reading with your finger to give them a point to focus on.
    • Find stories that interest them. Whether they are into dinosaurs or princesses. Topics that interest them is the key.

Always remember not to put pressure on your child to start reading. We all do things in our own time, but a negative feeling towards reading can last a lifetime. Instead, focus on creating a love for readingby reading them stories from a young age. When they are ready they will want to carry on finding the stories they love. Children will more readily follow what you do, so also make sure to show them that you make time to read your own books.

Literacy Test Practice – Comprehension

Your understanding of English comprehension will be tested in probably one of two ways. The most commonly used format is to present a passage, often from a children’s book of fiction. then, to present questions: usually about which statement is True or False. Plus some other questions about the meaning of the text.

Literacy Test Practice

We describe the second most commonly used format next.

Grammar Test practice tips

  • Good grammar requires consistency. So check that the tenses, the pronouns, the case, and the person are consistent throughout the set of statements.
  • Listen out for examples of incorrect grammar in your everyday life – they shouldn’t be hard to find! Think about what is wrong – and what the correct phrasing should be.
  • It might appear to contradict previously given advice, but I think it’s key to take your time with the grammar test. Carefully read and interpret the sentences – many of the options will be similar, and you need to pay close attention to detail in order to spot the errors.

Punctuation practice tips

  • Do an initial run-through of the text picking up the easiest punctuation errors. Then do a more careful sweep. Do a final check – time permitting – to ensure that you haven’t missed anything out.
  • It’s impossible to predict where the errors will appear, but it is likely that the errors will be spread out across the entire passage. This means that most sentences will contain at least one error.
  • Remember that punctuation needs to be consistent. For example, if the passage contains a list with items separated by semi-colons except for one item separated by a comma, then you should change the comma to a semi-colon.
  • In some instances, punctuation is a matter of personal preference. For example, some people like to use dashes, other people prefer parentheses. If you are unsure look at how the rest of the passage is punctuated. Make sure that whatever corrections you make are consistent with the rest of the passage.

Literacy Test Practice

Spelling test practice tips

  • Remember to go back and listen to a word again if you have time and are unsure of your answer.
  • This is not a “spelling bee” where you will be asked to spell progressively harder words. Instead, the words that you are being tested on are those that many pupils regularly use incorrectly. In other words, these are exactly the mistakes that a teacher needs to recognise and correct!
  • Memorize the correct spelling of any words you misspell on the practice test.
  • Re-learn a few simple spelling rules if you have forgotten them. For example, i before e except after c. Also, to make a word ending in “y” a plural add “ies”. For example, party becomes parties (not partys!).
  •  Learning how to spell a new word is easier when you say it aloud. Can you work out how to write it based on how it sounds?

Literacy test practice

Aptitude tests are exams designed to check whether a person’s knowledge and skills are sufficient to apply to a certain institution. Such tests are typically comprehensive as they evaluate a set of skills required for a curriculum, scholarship, job, etc. Due to this, it is important to know the type of test one needs to take and prepare for it because it can differ from other exams of the kind.

Literacy Test Practice

One of the popular tests in the United Kingdom is the 11 plus for six-graders who want to enter a grammar school that assesses their verbal and nonverbal reasoning, English, and mathematics. Literacy is a particularly important skill in the test since it is what all young people will need for both their studying and future employment. Indeed, one should be able to use the language properly in any sphere of life.

QTS Literacy test practice. Children at table with teacher.

Aptitude test practice for literacy tests

It’s not easy for an eleven- or twelve-year-old child to speak and write English without any grammatical mistakes, which makes 11+ rather challenging for them. However, if one practices their skills correctly, they will be likely to succeed. There are numerous literacy tips for young people who are going to take the aptitude test, one of which is consistency. This means that a sentence should be a grammatically correct unity of its parts that correspond with each other in tense, number, etc. Additionally, it is recommended that a learner analyzes mistakes in the texts they read or speeches they hear. Hence, when a learner finds a mistake, they should try to explain and correct them to themselves, thus practising their grammar skills.

As for spelling, it is better to focus on complicated words, in which learners make mistakes most often. There are certain rules which regulate the correct spelling of the majority of English words.

Students should learn the most important ones, such as the formation of plurality after “y,” etc. (“Literacy Test Advice and Free Literacy Test Practice”). Moreover, there are special practice tests online, which one can take prior to the final one to understand their weaknesses and work on them.

Preparing for any aptitude test, including literacy tests, requires effort from a person. Although, what is particularly important is attention. Knowledge might not be enough to pass the test if one lacks concentration and can be easily tricked.

Literacy Test Practice

Are Literacy tests like verbal reasoning tests?

In our opinion literacy tests are the most basic form of verbal reasoning test.

Some examples of the literacy type of verbal reasoning test are given below.

Both may take the form of analogies. Here, a respondent’s vocabulary and knowledge of simple verbal relationships are tested. In the case of verbal reasoning tests, as a key part of overall verbal reasoning ability.

Interpret the meaning that connects the word shown in large type on the left-hand side (i.e. spider in the first question) with the word shown in small type on the right-hand side (i.e. web). Apply the same verbal reasoning to connect the second word shown in large print on the left-hand side (i.e. duck) with one of the multiple-choice answer options.

Literacy practice. Girl reading book.

Verbal tests may also take the form of antonyms. Some examples of this type of verbal reasoning test practice are given below. Select the multiple-choice option that is the opposite in meaning to the word shown in bold print.

Verbal tests may also take the form of selecting the odd word out from a group of words. Some examples of this type of verbal reasoning test practice are given below. Identify the common connection between four of the five words and then choose the multiple-choice option corresponding to the odd word out.

Literacy practice test

Spelling Tips

These literacy test questions typically present you with a sentence. This sentence contains a missing word. Insert the correct missing word from the four options. Although the practice questions that follow have a written format, they are at the same difficulty level as the audio test.

Punctuation Tips

Accurate punctuation is a key element of written communication.

Literacy practice. Old books

Punctuation test questions typically present a block of all the possible punctuation marks and the letters of the alphabet on-screen. You will drag the correct punctuation from this block to its position in the passage.

Literacy Skills Test Practice

Grammar Tips

The use of good grammar is an essential component of effective written and spoken communication

Grammar test questions typically ask you to select the correct phrase or sentence to insert into a short passage. You may be given a choice of several choices, only one of which is grammatically correct. In the practice questions below, identify which sentence is grammatically correct.

Literacy Test Practice. Girl reading book

Literacy Practice Test – Comprehension Tips

These literacy test questions typically measure your ability to fully comprehend passages of text.

For each passage, you need to consider both the overall meaning and detail. To assess the bigger picture, ask yourself questions such as: What is the main message? Who is the intended audience? When reflecting on the passage’s detail ask yourself: What are the facts? What’s the most important information in a passage?

Comprehension Tips

  • Presenting the same information in a different way
  • Identifying the key points
  • Inferences
  • Deductions

Literacy Practice Test

Comprehension Question Types

There are several different questions types that you might encounter in the comprehension test.  Go with your instinct. Think about the reading level and tone. Does it sound like school policy to you? Does it read as though it is information for teachers? Is the piece’s reading level accessible to pupils?

Another question format asks you to suggest summary headings. Analyse the main point(s) of the paragraph objectively. It can be helpful, particularly if you are short of time, to focus on the first and last sentences in a paragraph. This is where you are likely to find the topic sentence. In a well-written paragraph, the topic sentence summarises the paragraph’s main point.

– Firstly, summarising the main points that the passage makes.

– Secondly, placing statements based on the passage into set categories.

– Thirdly, putting sentences about a passage describing sequential events into the correct order.

– Thirdly, putting sentences about a passage describing sequential events into the correct order.

Literacy practice test

Types of Literacy Test

Literacy Test Type I

I want the promotion so ________ but they have told me I _________ first stop being late.

  • Much; Am going to
  • Many; Really must
  • Much; Have got to
  • Many; Have to

Literacy Test Type II

Which two words can be swopped over to create a proper sentence.

The only way to maintain a low economy is to ensure that unemployment is strong and productivity is high.

Literacy Test Type III

Select one word from inside each set of brackets to create a new word.

(cool prior tame) (breath ant pea)

Literacy Test Type IV

Which word fits in both sets of brackets?

(Verdict, Decision) (Write, Grammar)

Punctuate Sentence Destroy Annihilate

literacy girl holding globe above her head

GENERAL AND SPECIFIC COGNITIVE ABILITIES

Mental abilities and aptitudes refer to the individual’s intellectual potential —

  • What can the person do, and what are their intellectual limits?
  • How easy will it be to develop new skills, to pass examinations, and to respond to career demands?

Literacy practice test

The concept of intelligence is made of general and specific intellectual abilities. General intelligence is a broad general ability that is involved in all types of intellectual performances. Its existence is demonstrated by the positive correlations between different intellectual tests (e.g. maths, English, geography, IQ.). This general ability is made up of a moderately related set of primary abilities.

There are several specific mental aptitudes. The most important ones are:

Verbal reasoning assessment

This is the ability to understand verbal ideas and to reason with words.

It is often connected with literary careers but is also a very important attribute in those careers which involve the ability to find the right word in the right time.

This may be the spoken word or the written word and is the single most useful strength in any kind of academic study.

Numerical reasoning

The numerical ability is similar to, but not the same as, mathematical ability. It is the ability to think in numbers rather than the ability to manipulate them. There are comparatively few careers which require numerical ability alone; it is more often mixed with other abilities. Careers which heavily dependent upon this ability include those of an auditor, an accountant, a wage clerk, a bank teller, a bank officer, financial consultant, financial manager, and many areas of the financial businesses.

Literacy practice test

Visualization

This involves the ability to “see” abstract information and to make sense of it. It is one of the cornerstones of scientific thinking. The stages of building concepts, discovery, and proving theories all rely heavily on this aptitude. Thus, it is the key to most scientific-based careers, including those as a research scientist, a laboratory technician, a veterinary surgeon, a dietician, hospital technician and similar science-based personnel at all levels.

Analytical reasoning

This is the ability to make logical, factual connections and to impose a structure on what sometimes appears to be chaotic information. This reflects the ability to think quickly, confining to the facts only, to solve problems and to deal with new ideas. It is often combined with other aptitudes to indicate the direction in which this ability to think is going to be used. This is particularly important for careers such as computer programmer, researcher, or analyst.

Spatial Ability

Spatial ability involves visual skills. It enables a person to visualise a solid three-dimensional object when given limited two-dimensional information. It is the corner-stone of understanding technical drawings, layout, and relationships between objects in space; as such it will be used heavily by draughtsmen, creative artists, photographers, architects, and designers.

Accuracy and Speed Skills

This ability allows an individual to do routine tasks quickly and with great accuracy. It is one of the few aptitudes that can increase with practice, but the results give a realistic indication as to how easy an individual finds this kind of task compared with others. It is of great importance in quality control, and of particular use in many administrative and clerical areas such as filing, typing, computer operation.

Literacy practice test tips

Our focus here is on providing you with the most useful Literacy practice tips.

  • Fisrtly, we’re focusing on one of the key communication skills in professional life. That’s why literacy is often included in aptitude exams.
  • Secondly, to prepare properly for literacy tests, you must plan your practice correctly.
  • Thirdly, before starting your literacy practice, find a quiet place to work.
  • Set a timer on your phone to see how quickly you can answer the literacy test questions (Williams, Passing verbal reasoning tests book, 2012).
  • In addition, is better to prepare for a specific exam instead of solving random literacy test questions.

Literacy Practice Tests – Spelling Test Tips

Spelling tests measure your ability to spell correctly. This is an audio test in which you listen to the questions through headphones. You need to use standard English spellings.

Each question presents you with a sentence. This sentence contains a missing word. Insert the correct missing word from the four options. Although the practice questions that follow have a written format, they are at the same difficulty level as the audio test.

Literacy Practice Tests – Punctuation Test Tips

Punctuation tests present blocks of text with missing or incorrect punctuation. You need to highlight each punctuation error and also where missing punctuation should be inserted.

Literacy Practice Test – Grammar Test Tips

Grammar tests measure your ability to use good grammar, an essential component of effective written and spoken communication

Literacy practice test

Comprehension Test

Comprehension tests measure your ability to fully comprehend passages of text:

  • Firstly, Presenting the same information in a different way.
  • Secondly, Identifying the key points.
  • Thirdly, Inferences.
  • Lastly, Deductions.

There are several different questions types that you might encounter in the comprehension test:

  • Firstly, go with your instinct.
  • Secondly, think about the reading level and tone.
  • And also ask yourself, Does it sound like school policy to you… read as though it is information for teachers?

More Literacy Practice Test Tips

Firstly, analyse the main point(s) of a paragraph objectively.

Secondly, don’t be misled by something that’s only mentioned once in a single phrase or sentence.

Thirdly, focus on the first and last sentences in a paragraph. In our opinion, the topic sentence summarises the paragraph’s main point.

For each passage, you need to consider both the overall meaning and detail:

Further Verbal Comprehension Tips

  • Firstly, What is the main message?
  • Secondly, Who is the intended audience?
  • Then next, What are the facts?
  • And also, What’s the most important information?

– Firstly, summarising the main points.

– Secondly, placing statements into set categories.

– Thirdly, putting sentences into the correct order.

Verbal Reasoning tips

Key words

Watch out for certain keywords and phrases in either the passage or question (or both!). These keywords often act as the link between different pieces of information. In many cases they qualify the information that has been given. When you come across keywords in passages and questions you need to focus on their precise meanings.

Contrast words verbal reasoning tips 

Spain has always been a popular tourist destination, however it now faces competition from cheaper resorts in other countries.

You need to pay careful attention to the information that follows the contrast word. This is often the key to answering the question.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: Spain is unrivalled as a tourist destination. The answer is False. The sentence says that Spain has always been popular, Then goes on to say that it now faces competition.

Propositions tips example: 

The author claims that his book will improve your verbal reasoning test performance.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: This book will improve your verbal reasoning test performance. Yes, there is a very good chance that this book will improve your performance if used properly. However, this is not a fact so the answer has to be Cannot tell.

Comparisons tips example: 

There is less unemployment in the UK today than at any other point in the past decade.

So, it follows that unemployment rates are lower than they were five years ago.

Absolutes and generalisations tips example: 

UK Most educators agree that excessive television viewing usually damages a child’s concentration.

If faced with the statement: Excessive television always damages a child’s concentration you might be tempted to answer True. The answer is, in fact, False – because the word usually tells you that this is a high possibility, not a guaranteed effect.

So, to summarise: don’t assume that usually means the same as always. In the world of verbal reasoning tests, such words are miles apart!

Verbal Reasoning Test Practice Tips. Executive members of a team discussing strategy.

Cause and effect

After doing lots of practise tests you will come to recognise cause and effect words and phrases. These include: since, because, for, so, consequently, as a result, thus, therefore, due to and hence. It is a good idea to focus on these as often a question will ask you to interpret how these words have been used to link different aspects of an issue or argument together. There are subtle differences between these words and phrases, as some signal stronger causal relationships than others. A word like because indicates a direct causal link. The word so also joins facts together but does not necessarily mean that it was the first fact that led to the second.

More verbal reasoning tips

  • Firstly, the introductory statement. What points are made?
  • Secondly, the main body of the text. What does this explore/detail?
  • Thirdly, the final statement(s). What details are provided here?
  • Fourthly, the final summary at the end of the passage, what point, if any, is it making?

Finally, ask yourself again. Do I have a sufficient understanding to answer the set of questions? If the answer is yes, then you are ready to carefully read the first question. You may only need to read the passage in full twice if you already know where to find the relevant information. Remember that the passage will always be there for reference. So you don’t need to memorise it.

Don’t worry if the subject matter in the passage is unfamiliar to you. Many of the passages you read will be about areas in which you have no interest or background knowledge. Nor do you need to apply any outside knowledge of the subject.

A reading comprehension task requires you to extract the relevant information to answer each question. Each question will relate to a particular part, or parts, of the passage.

Verbal Reasoning tips examples

1) As a result of oversubscription, Adam did not get a place on the philosophy course.

2) The philosophy course was oversubscribed so Adam enrolled in a different class.

What is the answer if you are asked: Did Adam get a place on the philosophy course? In the first sentence, you know that he did not. The second sentence is more ambiguous. Perhaps Adam got a place, but opted out of the overcrowded course.

Be careful not to mix up causal words with words such as then, next, after and later. These words indicate a chronological sequence rather than a causal effect. For example, then does not imply that one thing caused another to happen, only that it happened after.

Verbal Reasoning tip – Speculation

Look out for words or phrases indicating speculation, such as perhaps, probably, possibly and maybe. Words such as may, might and can also point to the possibility of something happening. You need to tread carefully with such phrases – they do not mean the suggested outcome is guaranteed, only that it is a possibility.

If you are told – The team is almost certain to win the championship – you should not interpret this as meaning that the team will definitely win. It is just speculation, even if there are good reasons for making that prediction.

Verbal Reasoning tips example

Conglomerate Plc announced redundancies in its accounts team, as well as job losses in its logistics and human resources departments.

You may be asked to say whether the following statement is True or False: Conglomerate Plc made redundancies in three parts of its business. The answer would be True because the statement mentions job losses in accounts, logistics and human resources.

‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test Design

Specific design criteria were applied.  Sufficient administration time was made available for a test taker to exhibit the appropriate reasoning ability. 

Other design criteria related to the target population groups. For example, this form of verbal reasoning test does not require the candidate to have any technical knowledge of grammar. Or to be able to spot minor errors in the spelling of unfamiliar words.

Practical examples are proved at the start of each test. Thus, test takers can familiarise themselves with the test format.

VERBAL REASONING TEST DESIGN RATIONALE

Many jobs involve working with verbal information and verbal comprehension forms a core component of almost all senior managerial roles.  The ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test measures the verbal reasoning skills that are fundamental to effective communication in such roles. 

In many organisations, verbal reasoning skills are key to the effective dissemination of business information across the workforce.

‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test assesses how well an individual’s verbal reasoning skills can operate at a high-level.  In our opinion, primarily understanding written communication. Although, ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test also encompasses the ability to understand complex discussions.

Verbal reasoning is central to many roles. Thus the ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test is appropriate for a very wide range of senior job roles and tasks.

VERBAL REASONING TEST FORMAT

Many graduate and senior managerial roles require quickly extracting relevant information from written documents. And to make a judgement based on this information.  Thus ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test measures the ability to read. And to interpret a detailed block of text under strictly timed conditions.

The verbal information in the test appears in the form of passages of text. Each is followed by a series of 4 multiple-choice questions.  Each question requires relevant pieces of information to be extracted from the passage.And a specific judgement to be made on the basis of that information. 

Verbal Reasoning TEST DESIGN

After reading a passage the test taker has to read a series of statements referring back to information contained within the passage.  The test taker has to identify whether the statement is true. Or false. Or whether it is not possible to tell. Then to decide which is the appropriate multiple-choice answer to fill in. 

Each answer must be based solely on the information presented in the passage – ignoring any background knowledge that the test taker may possess.  The questions must also be answered without any interference from the test taker’s own beliefs about the subject matter. 

This reflects work conditions where there is a need to make objective decisions based solely on the information available at that moment in time.

Number of Items:          48

Test Time:         25 minutes

Time needed for Administration (including Test Time):     35 minutes

EXAMPLE APTITUDE ITEM

For each statement, fill in either T, F or CS on the answer sheet.

These corresponds to your decision as to whether the statement is True. False. Or whether it is not possible to tell.

T: True                    

F: False                   

CS: Cannot Say      

Verbal Reasoning Test Prep

Whether you are aware of it or not, you use your verbal reasoning test skills when following a new recipe, reading a notice at a train station, applying for a bank account, or browsing through holiday brochures.

Of course, the best way to improve your performance is always through practice. You’ll get the most benefit if you practise with questions that mirror the exact test you are preparing to take.

There are many skills that you can practise in advance. The test-taker needs to concentrate, pay attention to detail and interpret the meaning of individual words and phrases as well as analysing the overall meaning of a text passage. When answering individual questions the test-taker needs to focus on extracting the relevant verbal information. Imagine yourself as an eagle, circling over the overall passage and then swooping down to zero in on your prey – i.e. the bit of information needed to answer the question correctly.

Verbal Reasoning Test Practice Tips. man in suit at computer, thinking.

Different types of verbal reasoning test

Broadly speaking, the earlier in an assessment process that you are being asked to complete a verbal reasoning test the more important it is to pass. Candidates who do not pass are sifted out of the process, allowing employers to focus on applicants whose skills are most suitable for the job.

Effective verbal reasoning skills are also one of the selection criteria for certain professions

  • medicine’s UKCAT.
  • teaching’s QTS.
  • legal sector’s LNAT.

Verbal reasoning tests allow employers and university admissions officers to assess such skills of a large number of applicants in a standardised way. The same verbal reasoning test is given to a large number of applicants, which increases the fairness of the application process – whilst also making the process more efficient.  A well-designed verbal reasoning test offers both a reliable and a valid means of assessment.

Aptitude Test Practice Strategies

Firstly, skim read the passage to get a rough idea of its content.

Secondly, skim read the questions to get a rough idea of the level of difficulty and the sorts of things that you are going to be asked. Steps 1 and 2 will prepare you for the level of complexity and the time that you need to spend answering the questions.

literacy test tips

Thirdly, read the passage again! Go through the passage again but read it more carefully this time. Do not spend time trying to memorise the details. Instead, think in broad terms about the different areas that the passage is covering. Try to make mental notes about where the specific pieces of information relating to each area are located in the passage.

Fourthly, try to get a broad sense of what you are going to be asked in each question and to know where this information was covered within the passage. Ask yourself: Am I in a suitable position to answer the questions? For more complex passages the answer to this will be no. Read the passage a third time. Try to identify the pieces of information in the passage that seem particularly important.

Verbal Reasoning tips example: 

UK Most educators agree that excessive television viewing usually damages a child’s concentration.

If faced with the statement: Excessive television always damages a child’s concentration you might be tempted to answer True. The answer is in fact False – because the word usually tells you that this is a high possibility, not a guaranteed effect.

Cause and effect

You will come to recognise cause and effect words and phrases. These include: since, because, for, so, consequently, as a result, thus, therefore, due to and hence.

There are subtle differences between these words and phrases, as some signal stronger causal relationships than others. A word like because indicates a direct causal link. The word so also joins facts together but does not necessarily mean that it was the first fact that led to the second.

Verbal Reasoning tips example: 

Spain has always been a popular tourist destination, however, it now faces competition from cheaper resorts in other countries.

You need to pay careful attention to the information that follows the contrast word as it is often the key to answering the question.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: Spain is unrivalled as a tourist destination. The answer is False. The sentence says that Spain has always been popular, but goes on to say that it now faces competition.

Who needs good verbal reasoning skills?

As you’ve seen above, everyone needs to have basic verbal reasoning skills to survive daily life. And good verbal reasoning skills are a key prerequisite for many different jobs. Any job that involves frequent communication requires verbal reasoning skills.

At the graduate and managerial levels, many jobs require the interpretation and critical analysis of complex verbal information.

Let’s have a look at a typical office environment and how different workers use verbal reasoning skills to perform their duties.

literacy tips

Why do I need verbal reasoning test practice?

Verbal reasoning ability links to job performance. This is why verbal reasoning tests are so popular for firstly job selection. Secondly, for entrance to certain professions and postgraduate degree courses. Only those where it is essential to work effectively with verbal information.

Many medium-sized and large employers also make extensive use of ability tests. For example, verbal reasoning tests. This is part of their standard recruitment and promotion processes.  Ability tests differentiate high from low performers.

A well-designed verbal reasoning test is a reliable and consistent assessment. It focuses on those verbal skills required for effective work performance.

Ability tests allow employers and university admissions offices to assess a large number of applicants for competitive positions in a standardised way. The same ability test can be given to a large number of applicants. Their results are an efficient means of comparision. This standardisation makes the process much fairer. When compared to old-fashioned, unstructured interviews.

There are many, many different types of verbal reasoning test. These aim at a general level (e.g. graduate tests). Or at a specific career path (e.g. for medical school or law school). There is a corresponding range in difficulty.

literacy tips

Top Ten verbal reasoning test tips

  • Practice has been shown to improve test results. So get in all the practice you can before the big day! Then, it will be easier for you to get into the right mind-set on your actual test day.
  • Ensure that your practice material is as close as possible to your actual test. Find out in advance as much as you can about this verbal reasoning test.
  • Set aside a quiet time when you are unlikely to be disturbed to practice. To do well on the test you’ll need to stay completely focussed. So use high levels of concentration in your practice sessions as well.
  • Pace yourself. Aim for a calm but efficient approach and work systematically, tackling one question at a time. The goal is to complete as many of the questions as possible in the time allowed. If you work too fast, you’ll make unnecessary mistakes. If you go too slow then you won’t complete enough questions.

literacy tips

Top Ten verbal reasoning test tips Part 2

  • If in doubt, double check that you have read the statement correctly. Check that you understood exactly what the question is asking you. Misreading a question can cost you points. Similarly, misreading instructions is a potentially disastrous mistake. So make sure you fully understand the instructions before you begin.
  • Stay positive. If you find yourself struggling with a question, remember that every question is worth exactly the same. Rememebr, it’s just one point. You won’t be expected to get every question right. Or even to complete every question, to pass the test. Aim firstly to do your best. Secondly, to answer as many correctly as possible.
  • You won’t succeed if you guess all your answers. However, if time is running out it makes sense to guess. Putting the same answer option for all your remaining questions may get you a few extra points. So go for it!
  • Learn from your mistakes. You will probably get some of the practice questions wrong. Review the correct answers. Thus you will fully understand where you went wrong and how you need to approach such questions next time around.
  • Check your average time per question when you review your results. Do you need to pick up your pace? Do you need to slow down?
  • Get a good night’s sleep before the test so that you will be fully rested and able to perform to the best of your abilities. Give yourself plenty of time so that you arrive a the testing location with time to spare.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Managerial roles

Most managers will need to use higher levels of verbal reasoning when reading or preparing reports. They need to be able to adapt their spoken and written communication style to the situation, whether addressing their subordinates or customers/ clients. Other company reporting procedures, such as appraisals, also require clearly written documentation.

Senior managers and directors will need to use the highest levels of verbal reasoning skills when analysing company reports, dealing with compliance issues and statutory obligations. Here there is a need for concise and accurate communication.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Customer service roles

Effective oral communication is the key to handling customer queries or sales calls. Talking to customers on the phone or face to face demands a flexible communication style. For example, telesales personnel would be expected to respond differently to a customer who was complaining than to one who was a prospective sale. Persuasive presentation skills also rely upon a solid foundation of verbal reasoning skills.

literacy tips

Verbal reasoning test practice for PA or administrative roles

A PA’s responsibilities typically include written correspondence. For example, letters and emails, which need to use an appropriate tone and level for the intended audience. Administrative roles also need to check written documents. Also, to file these accurately. Plus, to keep on top of plans and procedures that have been agreed orally or in writing.

Verbal reasoning practice tests – Sales roles

Effective oral communication is the key for converting sales call prospects. In particular, sales roles in call centres which require an even more fluent style of communication style.

How to pass SHL verbal reasoning tests?

SHL abstract reasoning tests ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”. The easier questions typically at the start of the test, will involve one change in colour, position, size etc of the figures shown.

Questions become more difficult as you must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. Once you know one of the feature changes, check each answer option to discount any in conflict with it.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Managerial roles

Most managers will need to use higher levels of verbal reasoning when reading or preparing reports. They need to be able to adapt their spoken and written communication style to the situation, whether addressing their subordinates or customers/ clients. Other company reporting procedures, such as appraisals, also require clearly written documentation.

Senior managers and directors will need to use the highest levels of verbal reasoning skills when analysing company reports, dealing with compliance issues and statutory obligations. Here there is a need for concise and accurate communication.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Customer service roles

Effective oral communication is the key to handling customer queries or sales calls. Talking to customers on the phone or face to face demands a flexible communication style. For example, telesales personnel would be expected to respond differently to a customer who was complaining than to one who was a prospective sale. Persuasive presentation skills also rely upon a solid foundation of verbal reasoning skills.

Verbal reasoning test practice for PA or administrative roles

A PA’s responsibilities typically include written correspondence. For example, letters and emails, which need to use an appropriate tone and level for the intended audience. Administrative roles also need to check written documents. Also, to file these accurately. Plus, to keep on top of plans and procedures that have been agreed orally or in writing.

Verbal reasoning practice tests – Sales roles

Effective oral communication is the key for converting sales call prospects. In particular, sales roles in call centres which require an even more fluent style of communication style.

Useful Literacy Test Websites

Firstly, try test publisher websites. Visit the test publisher Website once you know the type of psychometric tests you will be taking. Since most test publisher Websites offer practice questions.

For example, practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM TalentQ and SHL sites. Reputable test publishers will send you some sample questions for you to practice in advance.

Secondly, familiarise yourself with the test format. Read the instruction and introduction sections carefully for each psychometric test you will take. This should ensure you are familiar with the test format.

Third, try to work efficiently without rushing

Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. You may find subsequent questions easier to answer. With the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions. Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

Fourth, stay positive

If you find yourself struggling with a question, remember that every question is worth exactly the same point. You won’t be expected to get every question right, or even to complete every question. To pass the test – just do your best and try to answer as many correctly as possible.

Fifth, learn from your mistakes

You will probably get some of the practice questions wrong. Review the correct answers so that you fully understand where you went wrong. You should learn how to approach such questions next time around.

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Numeracy Practice. Dice

Numeracy practice tests

Welcome to our numeracy test practice.

Our Numeracy Practice Test tips

There are many different psychometric tests like the aptitude test, personality test, verbal reasoning, inductive reasoning, logical reasoning, attention to detail, leadership test and many more. Well, numerical reasoning assessment is one of them. This is where all the graphs, long numbers and equations play an important role. 

Numeracy skills are very sought after by employers, and can help you progress in work and boost your job prospects.

Our improving Numeracy tips

With regards to maths, it’s best to ensure that your child is confident with everything on the KS2 maths syllabus. Reports from your child’s school should give an indication of whether your child has any major gaps in his/her knowledge. Use Key Stage 2 maths revision resources to fill any of these gaps, and be sure to revisit material that your child struggles on regularly.

Schools often take a modular approach to maths, which means that, if they cover fractions in September of Year 4, they may not cover them again until September of Year 5, by which time they’ve completely forgotten how to do them! Try to resist the temptation to ‘overrule’ your child when examining different methods with which to tackle the basic operations in maths; they will have been taught differently in their primary school and it is better to try and understand how they arrive at their answers, rather than try to impose the method that you were taught!

The most important thing is to ensure that your child is confident with the basics in the following areas and then move up to more complex worded problems in each area.

A typical numeracy test measures an individual’s ability to use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

Here are some examples of the Navy numeracy test:

Example Numeracy Tests

Navy Practice Test (Number Series)

Practice Test Answers (Number Series)

Navy Practice Test 2 (Number Series)

Practice Test 2 answers (Number Series)

Numeracy practise. Answering questions

Our numeracy test practice

This is our Numerical Reasoning Practice Test for your free practice. And here are the respective numerical reasoning online practice test answers.

Also, our Mental Arithmetic Practice Test for your practice. And here are the respective Mental Arithmetic practice test answers.

How difficult are numeracy tests?

The difficulty level of the test you take will reflect the level of numerical reasoning knowledge needed in the position or place you are applying for. The numerical reasoning practice tests in Part II of this book span a wide range of difficulty levels. This is deliberate and reflects the range of tests in current usage. Starting with the easiest and getting increasingly difficult, the practice questions cover the full range of numerical reasoning ability.

We think that the best order of priorities for practising any sort of numerical reasoning test is to ensure you have the basic numeracy skills by taking these Mental Maths Tests.

Free numeracy test sample questions

GL Assessment offer a popular school progress test called the CAT4 which assesses Literacy skills , numeracy skills and abstract reasoning skills.

<  <   <   FREE sample numeracy test questions    >   >   >

Numeracy practice test tips

Usually, candidates are provided with a variety of questions in accordance with the rule of one question = one minute.

Certain numeracy tests have a repeated pattern and this gives you an idea on how to prepare for it. So, ensure that you practice these portions thoroughly and make yourself comfortable with the different types of questions in these areas.

There are always some tips that you can utilize while preparing for your numerical reasoning assessment which are as follows. These tips will easily help you to get through the numerical reasoning assessment easily.

Start by calculating the available time per question. This will ensure you do not spend too much time per question.

Numeracy practice skills

Other Numeracy Test Practice Resources

More Numeracy Tips

  • While you are practising for the test, try doing it in the same way in which you’ll be sitting your real numerical reasoning assessment. Take your seat in a quiet surrounding with as less distraction as possible at a table. This will increase your focus and also make silence less intimidating and let you practice more thoroughly.
  • The numerical reasoning assessment will definitely not kill you but try to figure out the areas that you are getting wrong most of the time and practice those areas thoroughly. Focusing on those problems will help you to improve your overall test.
  • Thus, following these tips can be really helpful during the day of your numerical reasoning assessment. Do not stress. So, the type of job position you are applying for doesn’t matter, as it can be an investment bank, consultancy firm or the position of a manager, it is compulsory for you to take the numerical reasoning test.

Quantitative Reasoning Assessment Practice

Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

  • Firstly, before deciding on your final answer. You may be able to rule out one or two of the multiple-choice questions as incorrect.
  • Secondly, read each question and also review each chart very carefully. Take one chart and its associated questions at a time. Only start looking at the answer options once you have done this.
  • Ensure that you are also aware of the units of measurement that each question is referring to.
  • Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. So, remember that you may find subsequent questions easier to answer. If there is time at the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions.
  • Work efficiently, but do not rush. You may not finish the test. However, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.
  • Remember to only use the information that is provided in the charts. Do not use any of your own background knowledge.
  • Lastly, round up any decimal points and any pence.

Passing numerical reasoning assessments

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practise will improve your score, as well following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

11 Plus Maths Test-taking Strategies

Although there aren’t any quick wins for being good at Maths, some focussed test practice will improve your score – as will following a few test-taking strategies. As a timed test, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Practise some of the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. numerical reasoning test practise will prove to be an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. test pages these three sites cover most of the psychometric tests you are likely to find. For this reason alone I strongly advise practising sample questions from Kenexa-IBM TalentQ and SHL sites. ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

Welcome to our numeracy test practice, including our top numeracy test tips.

Introduction to Numeracy test practice

A typical numeracy test measures an individual’s ability to use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

GL Assessment’s Maths Progress Test in Maths

The best example of school maths progress tests is the GL Assessment Progress Test in Maths.

A progress test in mathematics entails assessing two means of learning maths that is using mathematical content and understanding and applying mathematical processes through problem-solving. The test is also essential in improving teacher workload as it has been designed to be easily accessible and straight forward with simple guidelines. It is also an accurate measure of progress and potential of a person, whether in classwork or job recruitment.

GL Assessment’s Progress Test in Maths is a good indicator of trends in performance in schools.

It provides a reliable year on year benchmark as it monitors progress performance of students over time. By carrying out the test, it is possible to identify the underperforming section of students and also identify incapable employees in an organization, therefore, acting as a valuable tool in intervention measures. All institution thus ought to consider Progress Tests in Mathematics as that will be able to highlight potentials of different persons in that institution and appropriate steps taken to address any crisis.

Aptitude Tests

An aptitude test is a test to:

  • Evaluate ability in a specific skill.
  • Assess what a person is capable of doing.
  • Predict their learning ability in various learning sessions in the organization.

Aptitude tests determine a person’s academic potential and their career suitability. Working as an intern can also help in ensuring that an individual passes the aptitude test, and having a career test is an excellent boost in ensuring individuals get jobs they admire. There exist various types of aptitude tests such as GL assessment progress test in math, nursing numeracy and literacy tests, navy numeracy, SHL numerical reasoning test, and a UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Tests. The above-stated tests are essential in assessing one’s qualification for a particular job.

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Test

Another form of an aptitude test is the UCAT test. The subtests include verbal reasoning, which helps to evaluate information presented in a written form exclusively. The decision making subtest, which evaluates one’s ability to make sound decisions and judgments using exclusive data. Quantitative reasoning determines the potentiality to evaluate the information submitted in a numerical form critically. The abstract reasoning subtest addresses both convergent and divergent thinking. The final subtest in UCAT test is the situation judgment test.

SHL Numerical Reasoning Test

An SHL test consists of verbal reasoning, numerical reasoning, inductive reasoning, and mechanical reasoning. It is highly used in organizations to test an individual’s ability in a competency that has been identified as necessary in a job role. The test is, therefore, significant in assessing the critical skills for a job or an institution success. Employers thus prefer SHL tests as they can easily evaluate the workability of the employees.

School Entrance Tests‘ Numeracy Tips

Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

  • Before deciding upon your final answer, you may be able to rule out one or two of the multiple choice questions as incorrect.
  • Read each question and review each chart very carefully – taking one chart and its associated questions at a time. Only start looking at the answer options once you have done this.
  • Ensure that you are aware of the units of measurement that each question is referring to.
  • Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. Remember that you may find subsequent questions easier to answer and that if there is time at the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions.
  • Work efficiently, but do not rush. Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.
  • Remember to only use the information that is provided in the charts and not any of your own background knowledge.
  • Round up any decimal points and any pence (whilst taking account of any specific instructions provided).

Maths Test tips

The general advice given is typical that some focussed Maths test practice will improve your score. Unfortunately, there aren’t any quick wins for being good at Maths. These numeracy test tips are useful:

  • As a timed test, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately.
  • Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.
  • Practise some of the most common numeracy test types online.

Armed Forces Numeracy Tests

  • Our Navy numeracy Test practice
  1. Navy Practice Test (Number Series)
  2. Practice Test Answers (Number Series)
  3. Navy Practice Test 2 (Number Series)
  4. Practice Test 2 answers (Number Series)

Armed Services Numeracy questions

1) What is the number 55.368 to two decimal places?

A  55.30

B  55.35

C  55.36

D  55.37

E   55.40

2) Add 456 to 9322

– – –  Numeracy test practice – – –

A  9678

B  9687

C  9778

D  9787

E   9788

3) What is 40% of 5000?

A  2000

B  2500

C  3000

D  3500

E   4000

4) A garden measures 20m by 15m. What is the area of the garden, in square metres?

A  150 square metres

B  200 square metres

C  250 square metres

D  300 square metres

E   350 square metres

– – –  Numeracy test practice – – –

5) Subtract 99.1 from 144.9

A  45.9

B  45.8

C  45.7

D  45.6

E   45.5

Numeracy Tips

This is our numeracy practice test. And these are our numeracy practice test answers.

Numeracy practise. Answering questions

Our numeracy test practice

This is our Numerical Reasoning Practice Test for your free practice. And here are the respective numerical reasoning online practice test answers.

Also, our Mental Arithmetic Practice Test for your practice. And here are the respective Mental Arithmetic practice test answers.

numeracy test prep tips

What are numeracy skills?

The most basic type of numeracy tips relates to the four basic mathematical operators.

Numeracy Test Tips

  • Start by calculating the difference between the first and second, and the second and third numbers. Can you see a pattern? If so it is likely to be a pattern based upon addition or subtraction. Is the sequence-based upon adding
  • The same number each time ?
  • Two numbers together each time?
  • Is the sequence-based upon subtracting the same number each time?
  1. If the series does not appear to be based upon addition or subtraction then the next option to consider is that it is based upon multiplication – for example multiplying by the same number each time.
  2. If this doesn’t provide a solution then consider whether it looks like two different series of numbers – rather than the more commonly found single series.
  3. Now you need to start thinking outside of the box. Try not to think in terms of the traditional counting system 1, 2, 3.

What is a numeracy test?

There are many different psychometric tests like the aptitude test, personality test, verbal reasoning, inductive reasoning, logical reasoning, attention to detail, leadership test and many more. Well, numerical reasoning assessment is one of them. This is where all the graphs, long numbers and equations play an important role. Since this is based on mathematics, the main objective of numerical reasoning assessment is to check the ability of the candidates to work with numerical information.

The numerical reasoning assessment is often a written test having a given time limit and its structure can be unconventional. The candidates taking this test often find it to be tricky or challenging when they compare it with their school or college level numerical tests.

– – – numeracy test practice – – –

How difficult are numeracy tests?

The difficulty level of the test you take will reflect the level of numerical reasoning knowledge needed in the position or place you are applying for. The numerical reasoning practice tests in Part II of this book span a wide range of difficulty levels. This is deliberate and reflects the range of tests in current usage. Starting with the easiest and getting increasingly difficult, the practice questions cover the full range of numerical reasoning ability.

We think that the best order of priorities for practising any sort of numerical reasoning test is to ensure you have the basic numeracy skills by taking these Mental Maths Tests.

Then to move on to some numerical reasoning practice. Finally, to practice with psychometric test publisher Websites.

Numeracy Test Intro

Numeracy reasoning tests are used to measure different forms of numerical reasoning ability, particularly the identification of trends in large sets of numerical data and the interpretation of tables/graphs. Thus numerical reasoning tests – especially those that are set at a higher level – ask candidates to analyse numerical information presented as line graphs, histograms, pie-charts, tables, etc.

In summary, numerical reasoning tests also ask candidates to: interpret statistics and other financial information; problem solve and apply your findings to a new numerical reasoning problem; use mathematical operations (e.g. fractions, ratios, percentages); and more specific operations, such as number distance, to solve numerical reasoning problems.

– – – Numeracy Tests Practice – – –

What do numeracy tests measure?

In simple terms a numerical reasoning test is a means of assessing a person’s ability to work with numbers.

At the numeracy level, only the basic mathematical operations need to be understood. That includes fractions and decimals.

For the 11 plus a wider numeracy skills base is required. To reach the pass level, a clear understanding of more complex mathematical operations is required. That means having a thorough understanding of ratios and percentages.

As well as how to interpret figures within numerical reasoning questions. These are written as a one to two sentence question. The 11 Plus Maths requirements also include working competently with financial figures, weights and other measures.

Numeracy practice test tips

Usually, candidates are provided with a variety of questions in accordance with the rule of one question = one minute.

Certain numeracy tests have a repeated pattern and this gives you an idea on how to prepare for it. So, ensure that you practice these portions thoroughly and make yourself comfortable with the different types of questions in these areas.

There are always some tips that you can utilize while preparing for your numerical reasoning assessment which are as follows. These tips will easily help you to get through the numerical reasoning assessment easily.

Start by calculating the available time per question. This will ensure you do not spend too much time per question.

Numeracy practice skills

More Numeracy Tips

  • While you are practising for the test, try doing it in the same way in which you’ll be sitting your real numerical reasoning assessment. Take your seat in a quiet surrounding with as less distraction as possible at a table. This will increase your focus and also make silence less intimidating and let you practice more thoroughly.
  • The numerical reasoning assessment will definitely not kill you but try to figure out the areas that you are getting wrong most of the time and practice those areas thoroughly. Focusing on those problems will help you to improve your overall test.
  • Thus, following these tips can be really helpful during the day of your numerical reasoning assessment. Do not stress. So, the type of job position you are applying for doesn’t matter, as it can be an investment bank, consultancy firm or the position of a manager, it is compulsory for you to take the numerical reasoning test.

Rob Williams latest book

Are you chasing a job that you really want, but need to take a verbal reasoning test to get it? With the help of this book, you’ll sharpen your skills and quickly become confident in your ability to pass.

Brilliant Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests book – also available for download from the Apple Store.

Further aptitude test practice.

MATHS 10-MIN TESTS

Feedback Now! Our 10-Min Tests with immediate feedback

Free Maths Practice Test

Our Ten Minute tests are very handy in getting that daily practice to stay ahead.

Try your hand at one or invest in a bundle. Ten-minute test practise might be just what you need.

Make sure to go through the answers at the end. Have a look at the steps in getting to the correct answer and make sure you understand. Try the test again.

GCSE Maths Practice Test Quiz

CAT4 Number Series. Computer code building an image

CAT4 Quantitative Test 1

11+ Maths Practice Test 1

Ten Minute Maths Test

11 Plus Maths Sample Test

Our numeracy test prep tips

Practice 11 Plus Maths questions

The table below shows the approximate flight distances of major airports from London.

COUNTRYDISTANCE (km)
ATHENS2400
CAIRO3500
CHICAGO6300
MADRID1200
MEXICO CITY9000
NEW YORK5500
RIO DE JANEIRO9200
SYDNEY17000

If it takes approximately 10 hours to fly to Chicago from London, then how many hours would it take to fly to Sydney? (Assume that the same plane travels at the same average speed to each destination).

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

25                    26                    27                    28                    29

A flight from London to Rio de Janeiro is re-routed to Mexico City. In kilometres what is the difference in the flight distance now flown by the plane?

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

200 less           100 less           100 more         200 more         500 more

Two planes leave London half an hour apart. The first plane to leave arrives in Mexico City 15 hours later at 04.00. If both planes fly at the same speed, when does the second plane arrive in Rio de Janeiro?

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

04.00               04.15               04.20               04.25               04.30

Our Numeracy practice tests

Practice Maths questions

In a wrapping paper factory the size of paper is given in terms of X, Y and Z.  X=3Y, and 2Y = 9Z.

If a sheet of paper is 2X long, then how long is it in terms of Z?

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

27Z                  18Z                  9Z                    12Z                  6Z

If it costs £6.48 to produce a roll of paper 54Z long, how much does it cost to produce a roll of paper 6X long?

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

£12.96 £3.24               £9.72               £1.08               £4.32

If Y = 10cm, then what is the area of a piece of paper that is 2Y long and 2X wide?

A                      B                      C                     D                     E

12.00               0.12                 18.00               1.20                 1.80

Numeracy test practice

Numerical Reasoning Test Practice

Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

  • Firstly, before deciding upon your final answer. You may be able to rule out one or two of the multiple choice questions as incorrect.
  • Secondly, read each question and also review each chart very carefully. Take one chart and its associated questions at a time. Only start looking at the answer options once you have done this.
  • Ensure that you are also aware of the units of measurement that each question is referring to.
  • Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. So, remember that you may find subsequent questions easier to answer. If there is time at the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions.
  • Work efficiently, but do not rush. You may not finish the test. However, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.
  • Remember to only use the information that is provided in the charts. Do not use any of your own background knowledge.
  • Lastly, round up any decimal points and any pence.

Passing numerical reasoning tests

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

numeracy practice tests

Aptitude Tests

An aptitude test is a test to:

  • Evaluate ability in a specific skill.
  • Assess what a person is capable of doing.
  • Predict their learning ability in various learning sessions in the organization.

Aptitude tests determine a person’s academic potential and their career suitability. Working as an intern can also help in ensuring that an individual passes the aptitude test, and having a career test is an excellent boost in ensuring individuals get jobs they admire. There exist various types of aptitude tests such as GL assessment progress test in math, nursing numeracy and literacy tests, navy numeracy, SHL numerical reasoning test, and a UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Tests. The above-stated tests are essential in assessing one’s qualification for a particular job.

UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Test

Another form of an aptitude test is the UCAT test. The subtests include verbal reasoning, which helps to evaluate information presented in a written form exclusively. The decision making subtest, which evaluates one’s ability to make sound decisions and judgments using exclusive data. Quantitative reasoning determines the potentiality to evaluate the information submitted in a numerical form critically. The abstract reasoning subtest addresses both convergent and divergent thinking. The final subtest in UCAT test is the situation judgment test.

Numeracy Assessment Tips

Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

  • Firstly, before deciding upon your final answer. You may be able to rule out one or two of the multiple choice questions as incorrect.
  • Secondly, read each question and also review each chart very carefully. Take one chart and its associated questions at a time. Only start looking at the answer options once you have done this.
  • Ensure that you are also aware of the units of measurement that each question is referring to.
  • Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. So, remember that you may find subsequent questions easier to answer. If there is time at the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions.
  • Work efficiently, but do not rush. You may not finish the test. However, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.
  • Remember to only use the information that is provided in the charts. Do not use any of your own background knowledge.
  • Lastly, round up any decimal points and any pence.

Passing numerical reasoning tests

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

SHL Numerical Reasoning Test

An SHL test consists of verbal reasoning, numerical reasoning, inductive reasoning, and mechanical reasoning. It is highly used in organizations to test an individual’s ability in a competency that has been identified as necessary in a job role. The test is, therefore, significant in assessing the critical skills for a job or an institution success. Employers thus prefer SHL tests as they can easily evaluate the workability of the employees.

Useful Numeracy Test Websites

Firstly, try test publisher websites. Visit the test publisher Website once you know the type of psychometric tests you will be taking. Since most test publisher Websites offer practice questions.

For example, practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM TalentQ and SHL sites. Reputable test publishers will send you some sample questions for you to practice in advance.

Secondly, familiarise yourself with the test format. Read the instruction and introduction sections carefully for each psychometric test you will take. This should ensure you are familiar with the test format.

Passing numerical reasoning tests

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

We offer many other free psychometric tips and practice tests.

Our numeracy practice book is called

Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests.

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Numeracy practice tests

We are assessment specialists in both work and education settings. For more insights into meaningful assessments contact Rob Williams Assessment for a comprehensive appraisal.

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